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Results tagged with Search options user 4477

Content related to computer security., i.e. content about policies, mechanisms, etc. needed make sure data is not leaked or corrupted and services available in all circumstances.

2
votes
Hiding the fact that you are using encryption is very hard. Consider that some minimal decryption software (like in initrd) must be stored in plain text somewhere. Seeing that and a disk full of rando …
answered May 20 '11 by stribika
4
votes
OpenVPN is designed to be secure. It will only allow clients who have the keys signed by you. The most important thing is keeping the private keys secure. Always encrypt them on the clients and check …
answered Mar 8 '11 by stribika
2
votes
Well your first link is about kernel mode arbitraty code execution there is not much you can do against that. Logging out won't help. Grsecurity and PaX could prevent this but I'm not sure. It surely …
answered Mar 8 '11 by stribika
7
votes
When you hibernate a computer all the memory (including all cryptographic keys) is written to the swap. I can't speak for all the Linux distributions and I am not familiar with OSX but Ubuntu uses cry …
answered Mar 20 '11 by stribika
3
votes
You need to set the proper kernel configuration options. Here is the relevant part of the documentation. I don't think you can do it from the gradm policy file.
answered Aug 17 '11 by stribika
2
votes
in my experience it adds no security only inconvinience. But if you want to see: iptables -m mac --help Logging MAC addresses could be useful but they are easily forged. Just add -j LOG or -j NFLOG …
answered Mar 5 '11 by stribika
11
votes
How about this: echo -n 'magic' | sudo tee /some/where/file > /dev/null Sure there are redirections in this but only tee runs as root not a shell. Works with dd of=... too.
answered Feb 22 '11 by stribika
119
votes
8answers
I would like to have the root account in safety even if my unprivileged user is compromised. On Ubuntu you can only use sudo for "security reasons" by default. However I am not sure it is any safer … operations (especially IO redirection) are more convinient with su but security-wise this seems to be worse. Login on a text-mode console seems to be the safest. Since it is started by init if an …
asked Mar 4 '11 by stribika