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Manipulating files: copying, renaming, searching, analyzing, archiving, etc. For operating on text in a file, see /text-processing. For questions about the Files file manager (formerly Nautilus), see /nautilus.

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The size of a filesystem is stored in the filesystem. (For most filesystems. I guess because it determines the size of structures like FATs or free space bitmaps). I don't believe there's a generic …
answered Apr 14 by sourcejedi
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muru's answer nicely explains the differences in behaviour. Depending on what you want, there could be multiple ways to achieve the exact same thing. In that case it can be a matter of "taste", or r …
answered Jul 21 by sourcejedi
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IMO the more common answer to your exercise would be ls *[^x]txt. I'm surprised that [!x] works equally well. I'm used to ! being for bash history completion, and causing weird problems because it's …
answered Jun 12 '16 by sourcejedi
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systemd uses @ in file paths: /usr/lib/systemd/system/getty@.service. I don't expect any problems for Linux users of your project. @ seems pretty safe to me. I haven't seen any networking command t …
answered Jul 9 '17 by sourcejedi
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use rsync --delete. This is useful even for local files (cp has no --delete option). However it is also super-dangerous. When you write an rsync --delete command, you should always run it first in … files or cluttering the wrong directory with files that don't make sense. I assume rsync's behaviour pre-dates the widespread use of path completion.) …
answered Aug 24 '17 by sourcejedi
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Since you're naming functions, we assume you already know that calling mmap() on a file requires an fd, which is typically (but not always) created with open(). Unless you use O_DIRECT, in kernels li …
answered Aug 11 '17 by sourcejedi
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size shows the traditional sections of an executable file. Notice that these traditional sections do not include debugging information, for example. Debugging information takes up a lot of space. F …
answered Dec 23 '16 by sourcejedi
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Run the file command on it. It will identify compressed files, as well as other common file formats. Note that ZIP is a common container format. E.g. EPUB and OpenDocument files are actually ZIP … files with specific content. My version of file recognises OpenDocument files - but if yours doesn't, it may say that your OpenDocument file is a ZIP file. This may not be the outcome you had in mind …
answered Feb 6 '13 by sourcejedi
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After the regular, FIFO and socket file types, mknod can also create device files. These are used to access devices. Granting access to devices is considered a privileged operation. Generally, we … -partition brw-rw-rw-. 1 root root 253, 0 Jan 18 15:05 root-partition I can read data from files I wouldn't otherwise have permissions on $ grep secret root-parition Binary file root-partition …
answered Jan 18 '16 by sourcejedi
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Try testing mkdir instead, that's what most people would be worrying about? touch doesn't create executable files. It masks those bits off in the mode parameter to sys_open(). Source code: 133 … is no X in the mode argument. You can't force programs to create executable (or world-readable, etc) files if they don't allow for it. A lot of file creation is going to look like that. Installing …
answered May 27 '15 by sourcejedi
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How can I make rsync create the new backup faster without making mistakes, by taking advantage of the older backup on the destination (some files might have been changed since the last backup … , but more files haven't)? Backing up with rsync does this by default, if you pass -a (and get the paths right, as per @xenoid's answer). And you want to pass -a anyway, so it's all good. The …
answered May 14 '18 by sourcejedi
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instruction is restarted). Note that DAX is a generalization of XIP to allow for writes as well as reads i.e. MAP_SHARED as well as MAP_PRIVATE. MAP_SHARED can be used for database files, for example …
answered May 25 '17 by sourcejedi
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would be useful for "small files", whereas /run should only be used for "communication primitives". I don't think this distinction is true either. The poster-boy for /run is udev, and I'm pretty … subdirectory beneath $XDG_RUNTIME_DIR. You need a place to put your larger downloads and downloads in progress and run unprivileged: use $XDG_DOWNLOAD_DIR. You need a place to put cache files which should …
answered Oct 13 '16 by sourcejedi
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For interactive use, I have a hack for the analogous case with mv: cd .. mv * tmp mv: cannot move ‘tmp’ to a subdirectory of itself, ‘tmp/tmp’ Ignore the error, everything else got moved :-P. Doe …
answered May 27 '15 by sourcejedi
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access to ~/Documents/tool/ and the files inside it. You don't need to change the files inside to access mode 700. So you didn't need to use the -R option of chmod here. And you don't need to fiddle … that umask is reset for GNOME Files, Text Editor etc (e.g. inside Gnome 3 on Fedora 28, as started from GDM). These apps run inside a systemd --user service (they are started through dbus.service), and …
answered Jul 8 '18 by sourcejedi

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