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Results tagged with Search options user 27653

Files containing data arrange in a table, often with commas (hence Comma Separated Values), to separate columns. Rows are separated by newlines (but not all newlines are row separators as fields can be quoted to contain the separator newlines. Use this tag for full-fledged CSV data not the simpler case of one record per line or completely unquoted (use csv-simple for that kind of data).

2
votes
Yet another answer with limited forks As there is a lot of forks to whipe out, there is a bash way for doing this using sed and only 1 fork to /bin/date: sedstr="" { i=1; read now; while …
answered Aug 24 '13 by F. Hauri
7
votes
There is a good response, using sed simply one time with a loop: echo '123,"ABC, DEV 23",345,534,"some more, comma-separated, words",202,NAME'| sed ':a;s/^\(\([^"]*,\?\|"[^",]*",\?\)*"[^",]*\),/\1 …
answered Nov 22 '12 by F. Hauri
1
vote
stand for csv (coma separated value) and present tsv (tab sep vals), so my script will work for any kind of tab, coma or space separated values (just look for last field). No fork, perl will do the date …
answered Aug 24 '13 by F. Hauri