Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 25985

The shell is Unix's command-line interface. You can type commands in a shell interactively, or write scripts to automate tasks. Use this tag for questions applying to /bin/sh and most compatible shells (ash, bash, ksh, zsh, …). For shell scripts with errors, please check them in http://shellcheck.net before posting here.

0
votes
If you have a preferred invocation of date, you can set an alias: alias date='date +%Y%m%d%H%M' Now whenever you type date, you'll get the output of date +%Y%m%d%H%M. You don't have to use the sam …
answered Nov 3 '13 by goldilocks
0
votes
To copy somefile to otherplace/somefile_ with modification date appended (eg, 2012_12_06): cp somefile otherplace/somefile_`stat --printf=%y somefile | sed -e 's/ .*//'` Probably easiest if you put …
answered Dec 6 '12 by goldilocks
2
votes
If you set a script file executable: chmod o+x alpha.sh And include the appropriate shebang (#!/bin/bash) at the top, you do not have to invoke it with bash. See man chmod for an explanation of o+ …
answered Jan 3 '13 by goldilocks
12
votes
Sometimes I find its information seems to expand that by --help help cd and cd --help are fundamentally different. help is a command built into the shell, and it provides information about other … commands that are built into the shell, meaning, they are not executables of their own, they are features of, e.g., bash. This can get a little confusing since some built-in commands also have …
answered Jul 11 '14 by goldilocks
9
votes
/bin:/usr/bin and there is an executable gotcha in both directories, the one in /usr/local/bin will be used by default. You can now -- in this same file, in another shell config file, or from the … new shell. There is a limitation in that if you want to append something that was prepended (i.e. move a path within $PATH) or vice versa, you'll have to do it yourself. …
answered Apr 12 '14 by goldilocks
4
votes
Instead of ctrl-c, move to the beginning of the line and do this: $ history -s "git commit -am 'FOO-123: fix issue with dorks around bars'" Hit enter. It won't execute, but it's now the last line …
answered Mar 20 '13 by goldilocks
6
votes
It's a file test operator. -d /some/path means "return true if /some/path is a directory". ! is negation, so ! -d /some/path means "return true if /some/path is not a directory".
answered Sep 10 '13 by goldilocks
31
votes
9answers
I'd like a way to add things to $PATH, system-wide or for an individual user, without potentially adding the same path multiple times. One reason to want to do this is so that additions can be made i …
asked Apr 12 '14 by goldilocks
3
votes
1answer
I've been playing around with the fish shell for a few days and I like it. In order to start fish in a terminal via a quicklauncher or menu, I'm using a script like this:1 #!/bin/sh export SHELL … =/bin/fish exec konsole # <- KDE's terminal emulator If I run this script from the command-line, it does what's expected: starts a konsole whose shell is fish. But run from a KDE launcher, $SHELL
asked Dec 31 '14 by goldilocks
17
votes
It does work. & forks the shell, starting a new process (you could think of it as & exit, except of course that syntax actually means something else). exit is a shell built-in that ends the shell … process -- in this case the new backgrounded shell. > exit & [1] 1709 > ps -p 1709 PID TTY TIME CMD [1]+ Done exit There's your job. It's done. It worked. …
answered Aug 15 '13 by goldilocks
4
votes
It's no more or less strange than the fact that we have an upper and lower case alphabet to start with. If you look in /usr/bin, you'll notice a (very) few executables exploit capitalization. A case …
answered Jan 4 '13 by goldilocks
76
votes
They aren't the same. $* is a single string, whereas $@ is an actual array. To see the difference, execute the following script like so: > ./test.sh one two "three four" The script: #!/bin/bash …
answered May 12 '14 by goldilocks
8
votes
since it's unquoted, if $1 is (e.g.) "hey x", the shell will will see x = x, so this construction is still not safe. The purpose of the x = x check is to determine if a variable is empty. A more …
answered Jun 11 '14 by goldilocks
2
votes
I am looking for information pertaining to what will transmit the fastest, given the same server. There should not be any significant difference because the bottleneck is the network speed. In …
answered May 16 '14 by goldilocks
7
votes
"Are there other reasons to recommend against this?" Of course: (3) Because one day I hope to add to the foundations built by the [-----------] and paranoid people who chastise others for aliasi …
answered Mar 5 '13 by goldilocks

15 30 50 per page