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Domain Name System (DNS) is a service that provides the resolution of host names to IP addresses. Use the [tag:dns] tag when you are troubleshooting DNS issues, configuring a DNS resolver or server, or are trying to understand DNS's involvement in your situation.

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has been applied to this domain yesterday. Maybe a DNS change. So one of the nameserver you query has the data just before the change, and the other one just after. I suppose if you do queries now … you will get the same replies always, or after 46 hour as the TTLs you report are huge. If it is your domain you probably have made multiple DNS changes yesterday and hence now caches do not have the …
answered May 11 '18 by Patrick Mevzek
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\ is allowed in DNS records (but in your specific case, its presence seems more of a bug during zone provisioning than anything else), but not in hostnames. DNS is 8-bit clean, it can manage records … with any character. There are however stronger constraints for hostnames. See this question and its answers: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/25199202/which-rfcs-specify-the-syntax-of-hostnames-and-constraints-on-dns-hostnames …
answered Jun 20 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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dig is a DNS troubleshooting tool: you either specify explicitely the DNS server you want to query or, if you do not, it will use what is specified in your resolv.conf. As written in its … host. For any other application on the system, needing to do a DNS resolution, this will be under the control of /etc/nsswitch.conf that lists the source of information to query to resolve hostname …
answered May 24 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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one will start again with first one). Note that failed to respond is not the same as responded with a failure. So some recommendations: Do not mix external (like public DNS resolvers) with internal … the cons? What prompted you not to use your ISP's recursive nameservers and/or installing some locally on your box or your network? There may be valid reasons to use public DNS resolvers, but it is …
answered Apr 8 by Patrick Mevzek
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related to DNS in whois systems, you should start by completely separate them in your mind as, beside the fact that they take their data from the same source (the registry database) they operate completely … is also another trick. If you do a DNS query (but please remember that this point does not invalidate the first point) for $TLD.whois-servers.net it will give you the name of the corresponding whois …
answered Nov 25 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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both a ccTLD and a DNS resource record type. If you add a final dot it is more clear that you are querying for the ccTLD. In the same way, if you have a search list configured in your OS (list of domain …
answered Apr 14 '18 by Patrick Mevzek
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Wikipedia on "Multicast DNS": It is a zero-configuration service, using essentially the same programming interfaces, packet formats and operating semantics as the unicast Domain Name System … (DNS). Wikipedia on "Link-Local Multicast Name Resolution": The Link-Local Multicast Name Resolution (LLMNR) is a protocol based on the Domain Name System (DNS) packet format that allows both …
answered Jun 25 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
2
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The systemd-resolve documentation says: The DNS servers contacted are determined from the global settings in /etc/systemd/resolved.conf, the per-link static settings in /etc … /systemd/network/*.network files, the per-link dynamic settings received over DHCP and any DNS server information made available by other system services. It think this explains your …
answered Jun 21 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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single source and/or provisioned out-of-band. For example, content can be in a database, generated in some place then distributed using rsync or equivalent to all nameservers. There are no DNS
answered Apr 14 '18 by Patrick Mevzek
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is this hostname that you put typically in /etc/hosts, as well as in the DNS (though it is not mandatory if you do not expect to use the name outside of the server itself) Then you can name … services. These services will, through the DNS, map to your server. Like www.burgers.de, mail.burgers.de, etc. In the DNS they will either be associated to A/AAAA records that will given them your server IP …
answered Apr 24 '18 by Patrick Mevzek
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Yes, since Debian uses systemd and its systemd-resolved resolver, which has a cache, as written in its man: systemd-resolved is a system service that provides network name resolution to local applications. It implements a caching and validating DNS/DNSSEC stub resolver …
answered Feb 5 '18 by Patrick Mevzek
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Your NAPTR is clearly wrong. Have a look at RFC2915. To start with, after order and preference the first string is related to flags. You have "GAB-62110" where the flags can be only S, A, U or P. So w …
answered Nov 3 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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Have you increased the zone serial after changing its content? It is mandatory, and you need to reload the name server After changing the Apache configuration, you need to reload it If you have permi …
answered May 13 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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When a recursive nameserver starts, such as the one sitting at 127.0.0.1 on your server, it does 'root priming' : it starts with some root server IP address it has on file (as distributed with the sof …
answered Mar 22 '17 by Patrick Mevzek
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ssh configuration is. The DNS resolution is governed on UNIX system by the content of /etc/resolv.conf which will, among other things, specify which nameservers will be queried for recursive queries …
answered Mar 11 '17 by Patrick Mevzek

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