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Disk partitioning is the act of dividing a hard disk drive into multiple logical storage units referred to as partitions, to treat one physical disk drive as if it were multiple disks.

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Here's how you can remove your swap partition and use the free/unallocated space for your / partition. Warning But first... Before running any of these commands, I insist you have backups for … partitions. Procedure Get the last sector of your swap partition. Review the output of parted /dev/sda unit s print. If the start/end sector range of your swap partition is not AFTER the start/end range of …
answered Jun 15 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa
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The issue is that you're not allowed to resize the root filesystem because it's in use. You can use Gparted to resize, but from a liveCD, not your Kali installation.
answered Jul 9 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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. For example, GRUB2 can boot from LVM, but you'll likely need a GRUB partition to do so. Re-partition /dev/sda according to what you learned in step 2. For example, you may need a small partition for … GRUB2 and the rest can be dedicated to LVM. You don't need to partition /dev/sdb. Create two LVM physical volumes, one on each disk. For example, pvcreate /dev/sda2 && pvcreate /dev/sdb Create a volume …
answered Dec 26 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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virtual block device which consists of multiple real block devices. That would simulate a partition of ~138GB. It's also possible to do something similar at the filesystem level using BTRFS, but here's … sure you back up your system first, since this process will wipe out /dev/sda1 and /dev/vda. Then boot Linux from a Live CD/USB drive and... Run wipefs /dev/vda to quickly clear out the partition
answered Apr 14 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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task; not recommended for those new to Linux. For completeness, you cannot add space to the front of a partition. You can only add to the back. For example, using the same partitioning example, if …
answered May 26 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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Do I have to create a partition for EFI boot even if I set legacy mode? Which kind of file format should be used? FAT32? Legacy mode is BIOS, so no you don't need an EFI partition. If I … have to create EFI partition boot how can I "save" information (if I needed them) from the current HD EFI partition? I mean that if I change all partitions from scratch, I'm afraid I can lose …
answered Oct 25 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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Do I have to create an efi partition on all 3 disks? No, you can simply create the EFI partition on one of the disks. However, this may impact how well RAID can utilize you hard disks because in … some RAID configurations storage is allocated in equal amounts on each disk. In such a case, the amount of space utilized by the EFI partition will not be utilized in the other disks. An alternative …
answered Jan 20 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa
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dd-ing the ISO to a partition doesn't work because the ISO itself contains a partition table, as you discovered. But what you can do is create your partitions after the fact. dd the ISO to the …
answered Jul 4 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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You don't have any unallocated space after the extended partition into which you can resize it. You can either reinstall or if you want to take the arguably more fun approach, perform the following … order. At this point you'll have two ESP's, so remove the original ESP to avoid any conflicts. Note that deleting the partition will not wipe out the data; The partition can be revived with the …
answered Sep 24 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa
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To use the mount command you need to provide: The device. The directory where you want to mount it (which must already exist). If the filesystem is not detected, then you'll need to provide the file …
answered Jun 5 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa
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I don't see the the Ubuntu boot loader in the partition layout You have an EFI system, which means that more likely than not the Ubuntu installer put the Linux kernel EFI stub, and perhaps other … files, into your EFI partition which is /dev/ssd1p2. Hence, there's no need to install GRUB to /dev/nvme. Check the contents of /boot/EFI. I cannot add Ubuntu to the Windows boot loader There's …
answered Oct 18 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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DopeGhoti is correct. To confirm a corrupted LUKS header, you can use the following command: cryptsetup luksDump /dev/sda5 You should get the same error message. To fix it, re-create the LUKS con …
answered Apr 17 '17 by Emmanuel Rosa
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No, you cannot add the to-be unallocated space residing after your Windows partition to your /home partition because you have other partitions between them. What you can do is create an LVM volume … group out of both partitions and then create a logical volume (not the same thing as a logical partition) in the volume group. By placing your /home into a logical volume you'd be able to use the space …
answered Sep 27 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa
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Regarding MSDOS partitioning: This would seem to indicate that the first hard drive has a fat partition of some sort on the second disk partition and is referred to as an msdos partition … with the content of the partitions, such as the filesystems used, such as FAT. Regarding slices: What is a sub partition and how does it differ from logical and extended partitions? More …
answered Sep 3 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa
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Given the position of sda8, the NTFS partition, you're going to have to perform some partition gymnastics to create an additional primary partition: Backup your NTFS partition to another drive … . This is easy to do with a tool like partclone. Remove sda8. Using gparted, move sda7 (/storage) into the unallocated space freed up by removing sda8; Though retaining the same partition size, of course …
answered Apr 30 '18 by Emmanuel Rosa

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