Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [unix-philosophy]

The tag has no usage guidance.

-10
votes
0answers
53 views

Why was Linux introduced even though Unix was sufficient [on hold]

Did Linus Torvalds create Linux to trash the ego of his professor?
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Are permissions like “---r-xr-x” useful?

Would a file permission tuple of "---r-xr-x", or something else without owner usability yet still with group/other usability ever be useful in the real world? I would love to see some use cases! ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Do other Unix-like kernels have stable syscall ABIs?

Linux has a stable syscall ABI, but NT doesn't, Windows just ensure Win32 ABI is stable, which will not trap into kernel space immediately. Lower level functions of Windows like nt.dll might change ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Why has there been so little innovation with autoconf configure scripts in the Unix and Linux ecosystem? [closed]

A great deal of time is lost at the time of ./configure; especially when dependencies are missing and the subsequent calling thereof. I've read many topics on this subject citing that caching the ...
61
votes
3answers
10k views

Why is Unix 'self-supporting'?

I was reading Ritchie and Thompson's paper about the Unix file system. They write, 'It is worth noting that the system is totally self-supporting'. Were the systems before Unix not self-supporting? In ...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

is there a Base64-based dist?

Is there a Linux distribution or Unix version where everything is Base64 encoded in memory? I'm interested in the concept of being able to dump the entire system state and print it as a book.
4
votes
1answer
392 views

Is UNIX System V's source still available?

I was wondering if the AT&T system V's source code still available.
9
votes
2answers
6k views

Why is the primary admin UID 501?

I understand* the primary admin user is given a user ID of 501 and subsequent users get incremental numbers (502, 503, …). But why 501? What’s special about 50x, what’s the historical/technical reason ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

How should Linux have been designed, if differently? [closed]

If Linus Torvalds could have designed Linux differently, what should he had done differently? I use and like Linux. I'm happy that Linux is so established and works so well. It's still somewhat a ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

How could one determine UID/GID of running process

Is there any way to retrieve UID/GID of running process? Currently, I know only way of looking it up in htop. But I don't want to depend on third-party tool, prefer to use builtin unix commands. ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Where should daemon status files go in the *nix hierarchy?

This is kind of a canonical question about the Unix/Linux filesystem. I am working on a little daemon that generates output like this every five minutes: Data1: 100 Data2: 201 Data3: 102 This data ...
19
votes
1answer
2k views

WHY a **login** shell over a **non-login** shell?

I have a basic understanding of dotfiles in *nix system. But I am still quite confused about this Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell? A bunch of different answers (including multiple ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Get the time sequence in Unix?

Actually I expect the output like from current timestamp to 10s+current timestamp ex: 11:49:01 11:49:02 11:49:03 ..... 11:49:10 But this output must be coming in banner output. Hint: I am able ...
13
votes
2answers
559 views

Should I output program's name when warning or error occurs?

If I'm writing a script or a program, should I output to stderr its name together with warning or error message? For example: ./script.sh: Warning! Variable "var" lowered down to 10. or: ./prog.py: ...
1
vote
1answer
199 views

Why can't unix be object oriented or at least organized [closed]

Why can't things in unix be represented as objects? For example, files are sort of objects, but they are all just files. I realize that this can be useful for providing a standard interface, but ...
2
votes
0answers
140 views

Is using threads still considered an anti-pattern? [closed]

Background In The Art of Unix Programming, Eric S. Raymond dismisses multithreaded programming as a performance hack that should be avoided. According to him, the biggest problem with threads is that ...
2
votes
2answers
900 views

Unix, Mac OS and Linux? [closed]

I am working to learn more about unix and linux for a project. I noticed that Unix is the parent system of Mac OS and also of linux. Are the two similar in scope of C based programming? And how ...
72
votes
12answers
11k views

What's the philosophy behind delaying writing data to disk?

In Linux, a finished execution of a command such as cp or dd doesn't mean that the data has been written to the device. One has to, for example, call sync, or invoke the "Safely Remove" or "Eject" ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Dependency hell: Why not create portable applications [closed]

Back in time to the ages when I was using Windows, applications were installed in an independent way. This left a lot of freedom to the end user/sysadmin to decide what and where to upgrade, what to ...
4
votes
2answers
241 views

Why should you avoid “stringently columnar” input formats?

Doug McIlroy, the inventor of Unix pipes and one of the founders of the Unix tradition, had this to say at the time [McIlroy78]: (ii) Expect the output of every program to become the input to ...
-1
votes
1answer
160 views

What are the commands which will work in unix but won't work in linux [closed]

Pls list the command or the scenario which will work in Unix but will never work in Linux
6
votes
2answers
927 views

Why is Linux “Unix-like” if its kernel is monolithic?

As I understand it, part of the Unix identity is that it has a microkernel delegating work to highly modular file processes. So why is Linux still considered "Unix-Like" if it strays from this ...
3
votes
1answer
119 views

Has Unix been used by accountants and other non-programmers at AT&T in the 70s and 80s?

In the short documentary, Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie Explain UNIX (Bell Labs) it is mentioned, that Unix is not only an OS, but also a system around which a community could form. I find this ...
23
votes
4answers
3k views

Are Unix Internet sockets files?

I understand that "Everything is a file" is one of the major concepts of Unix, but sockets use different APIs that are provided by the kernel (like socket, sendto, recv, etc.), not like normal file ...
18
votes
4answers
9k views

Is it correct to use certain special characters when naming filenames in Linux?

Is it correct to use certain special characters, as +, &, ', . (dot) and , (comma), basically, in filenames. I understand that you can use - and _ with no problem, but doing some research I have ...
7
votes
1answer
582 views

Why does MV(1) copy objects if permission to move denied?

Does mv act as cp(1) if permission for process to move denied? If so, isn't it against the rule do one thing and do it well?
10
votes
1answer
11k views

What does Unix programming mean, exactly? [closed]

I thought I understood what the term Unix programming meant, but now, after reading about it in a kernel/C programming context, I feel like I need to clarify the meaning of this term. It is not clear ...
32
votes
2answers
7k views

A layman's explanation for “Everything is a file” — what differs from Windows?

I know that "Everything is a file" means that even devices have their filename and path in Unix and Unix-like systems, and that this allows for common tools to be used on a variety of resources ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Mac OSX vs Linux Unix-ness [closed]

So I know that Linux is considered "Unix-like" while OSX is Unix. Why is this? I feel like Linux is much more "Unix-like" than OSX is. What makes OSX more "Unix" than Linux?
32
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is sort -o useful?

UNIX philosophy says: do one thing and do it well. Make programs that handle text, because that is a universal interface. The sort command, at least GNU sort, has an -o option to output to a file ...
20
votes
2answers
5k views

What makes an operating system “Unix-Like”?

I frequently come across the term "unix-like" on many web sites. There is no standard; it is just in the way it behaves. But if I were to develop a kernel from scratch, what would make it considered ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Has the Unix Philosophy been abandoned in web application design? [closed]

The Unix Philosophy encourages the use of small, generically reusable cooperating programs that collaborate with forms of inter-process communication like pipes, fifos, sockets, as opposed to shared ...
7
votes
1answer
791 views

Correct handling of Python2 and Python3

What is the correct way running scripts that depend on python2.x but on a system where python3.x is aliased with python. The solution should take into account the following things : Python2 should ...
4
votes
1answer
538 views

Unix and Linux without a file system?

I was reading Eric Raymond's the Art of Unix Programming, (Amazon and online) and at the very beginning of the book where he analyses what Unix does wrong he says: Having a file system at all may ...
7
votes
1answer
5k views

Why index files? [closed]

I installed Linux on something like 3 or 4 different machines last year, and in two cases, I had a serious urge to vomit after noting that file indexers such as virtuoso (Debian testing with the ...