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Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about words/terms that are specific to Unix and/or Linux.

0
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3answers
73 views

Creating a simple FTP server

I'm a bit confused about the terminology for Linux FTP servers. I'm just attempting to set up a simple FTP server. I thought was accomplished by FTPd but there seems to be no client/server for FTPd. ...
0
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0answers
67 views

What is the common term for Apache virtual hosts or Nginx block systems?

A webserver environment as with Apache or Nginx includes a type of file (or a file system) that I can call a webserver substrate; In Apache it is called a Virtual host and in Nginx I can call it a "...
5
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1answer
446 views

What does “process accounting” mean in Linux?

I'm working with Docker in action's book, and I have seen the term "process accounting" several times. I am in a containerization of the application context. I would like to know more about this ...
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2answers
47 views

Is a file descriptor ever NOT open?

Of course a file can be open, or not open. However, a file descriptor by definition refers to an open file (right?). (Well, except when it refers to something besides a file, like a pipe or what ...
0
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2answers
47 views

What is it called when you use a subshell to make sure temporary variables from a command are not left hanging around?

What is the technique called when you want your variables to disappear after they are run in a subshell? $ (lookForMe=wee && find -type d -name "${lookForMe}_*") $ echo $lookForMe $
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2answers
175 views

Why not seeing shell globs as a “dialect” of regex? [duplicate]

I often confuse Bash 3.x shell globs: ? # Match any single character. * # Match any string of characters (up until the asterisk). [set] # Match any character in set (but not the entire set ...
0
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0answers
19 views

What are files indicating state or error spitout during execution of a process called in Linux / Unix?

Say I ran a script and it succeded or failed and generated a file with a filename to indicate such a state or a specific error had occured on the last run. Also lets say that you could not rerun the ...
1
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3answers
76 views

Do variables and aliases fall under the same category?

This is a terminology/architecture question. Some of the most basic implementations for easier control of a system are variables and aliases (and some might add symlinks). Both variables and ...
21
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2answers
2k views

command line terminology: what are these parts of a command called?

At the command line I often use "simple" commands like mv foo/bar baz/bar but I don't know what to call all the parts of this: ┌1┐ ┌──2───┐ git checkout master │ └──────3──────┘ └───────4─────────...
3
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2answers
519 views

Globbing vs wildcards

What is the difference between globbing and wildcards, are they two terms for the same thing, or are they different?
-1
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1answer
472 views

Why is the ssh utility considered a pty?

I've read here that ssh is considered a pty. Why? If I run an ssh command in my console (say, in a Debian server), where comes the "pty" aspect of ssh here? For me, it's like I'm using any other ...
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1answer
53 views

What is the difference between shell builtins and shell keyboard shortcuts?

What is the difference between shell builtins (like cd or echo) and shell keyboard shortcuts (like ctrl+u or ctrl+l)? Both seems to me "builtins", what is the major difference by means of system ...
0
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2answers
176 views

Using a CLI after deleting all shells (rbash, bash, dash, and sh)

As for now, I use my CLI (Command Line Interface) with either rbash, bash, dash, or sh. Given this fact, one can assume that the CLI is not shell dependent, and that even if we will delete all of ...
0
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1answer
77 views

How come a Desktop Environment be one layer under a shell (kernel-DE-shell instead kernel-shell-DE)? [closed]

I ask the following question as a followup to this question. How come a Desktop Environment be one layer under a shell (kernel-DE-shell instead kernel-shell-DE)? Why I ask this question In Ubuntu, ...
1
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2answers
1k views

What is “Parameter expansion” (A.K.A “Variable expansion”) in shell-scripting in general and in Bash in particular?

I understand the term "Parameter expansion" (A.K.A "Variable expansion") to be an umbrella term for several unrelated operations in shell-scripting in general and in Bash in particular, such as: ...
1
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2answers
52 views

Should we call Bash Special parameters, “environment constants”?

After reading here and then here, I came to the conclusion, that what is called in Bash "Special parameters" is quite like environment variables, but the main difference is that we shouldn't reassign ...
21
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1answer
6k views

What does “LSB” mean when referring to executable files in the output of /bin/file?

I have found the term "LSB executable" or "LSB shared object" in the output of the file command in Linux. For example: $ file /bin/ls /bin/ls: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), ...
14
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6answers
4k views

Drive name? What is the correct term for the “sda” part of “/dev/sda”?

fdisk(8) says: The device is usually /dev/sda, /dev/sdb or so. A device name refers to the entire disk. Old systems without libata (a library used inside the Linux kernel to support ATA ...
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1answer
63 views

Why is it called “store.kde.org” (KDE-Store)? It's not a store [closed]

Why did people think it was a good idea to name the software distribution site for KDE "https://store.kde.org"? It's not a store. There's nothing that requires payment on there - a key requirement of ...
0
votes
1answer
627 views

What is iwlwifi's “lar_disable”?

I'm seeing a lot of posts reference lar_disable like this one for instance. I'm wondering what it does. modinfo iwlwifi just says, parm: lar_disable:disable LAR functionality (default: N) (...
0
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1answer
86 views

Text wrapping in Terminology

I just installed Enlightenment in OpenSuse Tumbleweed via YasT. I'm using E as the WM and entrance as the DM, if it matters. While checking its terminal emulator Terminology, I noticed that output ...
25
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3answers
2k views

How to say 'UN*X or *nix' in conversation or reading aloud? [closed]

Should it be 'star nix' or 'nix' or 'unix-like' or something totally different?
0
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1answer
181 views

What does e2fsck do during bootup?

Please assume I'm using a recent version of Debian Linux, on ext4, on a 2 TB Seagate Momentus hard drive, with all the default settings. A) What does e2fsck do during a normal bootup? (And what is ...
3
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1answer
1k views

terminology emulator lacks generic players in Lubuntu 16.04

terminology installed (apt update + apt install), and runs fine in a Lubuntu 16.04 fresh installation. But when trying to display a picture (or show thumbnail images with tyls), it always raises this ...
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1answer
515 views

What does the “al” in “alarm”, the default Arch Linux ARM processor username+password stand for?

ARM machines often have a default password. On Arch Linux, this is: User: alarm Password: alarm I am assuming that the "arm" part of "alarm" refers the architecture, but what does the "al" stand ...
11
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1answer
3k views

Can an interactive shell become non-interactive or vice versa?

Can an interactive shell become non-interactive or vice versa? Note: I've done a lot of research on the basic question, "What is the difference between interactive and non-interactive?", and the ...
14
votes
1answer
1k views

WHY a **login** shell over a **non-login** shell?

I have a basic understanding of dotfiles in *nix system. But I am still quite confused about this Difference between Login Shell and Non-Login Shell? A bunch of different answers (including multiple ...
1
vote
1answer
197 views

IP4LL: what is it?

On a desktop Debian Jessie GNU/Linux install, the file /etc/resolvconf/update-libc.d/avahi-daemon contains: #!/bin/sh # # If we have an unicast .local domain, we immediately disable avahi to avoid # ...
28
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1answer
1k views

Why does Plan 9 use “snarf” instead of “copy”?

When you watch presentations about Plan 9 and its acme editor you might notice that the name for copy is snarf (I wasn't able to find any meaningful explanation unfortunately). Why is it so? Is ...
19
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3answers
2k views

What does “on-line” mean, as used in man(1)?

On my system (Darwin 15.5.0), man(1) opens as follows: NAME man - format and display the on-line manual pages The file the page is formatted from, however, is clearly on disk: % man -w man /...
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2answers
103 views

Do we have 2 types of “Shells” in Unix? [duplicate]

As a Linux newcomer that really wants to understand Linux rather than just work with it automatically, I understand that the term "Shell" basically describes a software layer which is above the kernel ...
2
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1answer
49 views

How is the ability to do something on the fly and the ability to make that same thing permanent referred to in Unix / Linux?

I can think of many examples of this... You can use the ip/if* commands to set your network interface in the here and now, but you can edit a file like /etc/network/interfaces to make the changes ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Some terminology about CLI [duplicate]

Is there any difference in meaning between the following terms? Can they be used interchangeably? terminal console shell command line interface If any, what are the differences?
0
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1answer
38 views

What kind of times exist beside of runtime ? [closed]

I first encountered the expression "runtime" when s.o. told my that in Linux files ending in .ko are able to be loaded into the kernel at runtime to increase its functionality when needed. So, ...
10
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2answers
252 views

What does [[.ch.]] mean in a regex?

Alternate title: What is a "collating sequence" or "collating element" in a POSIX-compliant regex? I found the exact technical definition in Section 9.3.5 of the POSIX specs, as item #4 in the list, ...
1
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1answer
214 views

What can be considered as operating system? [closed]

I am talking about GNU/Linux but not about GNU or Linux! I know that Kernel is the core component in operating system but I want to know what defines the "operating system" (What can be considered as ...
6
votes
3answers
507 views

How do you call the “happy-dog” part of file “happy-dog.png”?

I just realized I don't know how file is called in file.ext. The whole file.ext is called a file or filename, ext is called extension but how do you call the file part itself of file.ext? For ...
33
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1answer
3k views

What is the significance of “tab” e.g. in “crontab” or “initab”?

What does the "tab" mean in "crontab" or "initab"? Having some idea of its meaning might help to mentally categorise files which contain the "tab" suffix and understand their relationship with the ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Does the shadow file have encrypted passwords?

man 5 shadow says this about the 2nd field: encrypted password Is that true nowadays? I think it should say "hashed password". Am I correct?
1
vote
2answers
108 views

What is the technical term for command line application environment programs?

Some programs that are run in the terminal, after calling them, switch the command line to their own environment, like "R" (statistical program language) or "GHCi" (interactive Haskell). What is ...
0
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2answers
1k views

Why do some processes end with the letter “d”? [duplicate]

Some Linux binaries end with a "d", for example sshd, httpd, ppd, etc. Why is this so?
23
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4answers
4k views

Terminology reconciliation: Display manager vs. session manager, Windowing system vs. Window manager

I am taking the Linux Foundation's Introduction to Linux course. Some of the terminology seems to overlap or contradict, especially when I try to supplement the course material with other sources, ...
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2answers
629 views

What is the concept hidden behind the term “command”?

I have been using, studying and developing for Linux for quite a few years now, and over time, I have successfully convinced a few people to join the cause, and make the switch to Linux. However, ...
11
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5answers
5k views

Why is “shebang” called “shebang”?

Does "shebang" mean "bang she"? Why not "hebang" as "bang he"?
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1answer
2k views

What does “quiet mode” mean for the mkfs command?

I was reading about the mkfs command and I came across something I don't quite understand: mkfs Syntax mkfs [-t fstype] [fs_options] device Options : ............ -q ...
4
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2answers
14k views

What does “batch mode” mean for the top command?

I was reading about the top command and I came across something I don't quite understand: top options: -b Run in batch mode. This is useful for sending output from top to other programs or to ...
20
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2answers
2k views

What does “magic tests” mean for the file command?

I was reading about the file command and I came across something I don't quite understand: file is designed to determine the kind of file being queried.... file accomplishes this by performing ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

How to call a method of configuring the result of which is active until the first reboot?

For example, you can configure a network interface and other settings from the command line of your terminal. But you can also save the settings to the file /etc/network/interfaces (Debian GNU/Linux) ...
6
votes
2answers
442 views

What's the difference between 'expansion' and 'substitution' in terms of shell programming's terminology?

Expansion and Substitution seems to be interchangeble at same context in shell programming language. For example, some documents such as Bash reference manual, Bash Hackers Wiki use the word '...
6
votes
1answer
391 views

Confusion regarding the term 'mount' in Linux

I am reading the man page of mount and clone. I understand that mount is used to add a directory hierarchy to a mount point (a directory). In clone's man page, under the CLONE_NEWNS section, they ...