4

I have booted Debian Wheezy from SD card on a Beaglebone Black board. Version: debian-wheezy-7.0.0-armhf-3.8.13-bone20.img.xz, from http://www.armhf.com/index.php/download/

I have set up my /etc/networks/interfaces file:

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto eth2

iface eth2 inet static
    address 192.168.1.101
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    gateway 192.168.1.2
    dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8 8.8.8.9
# wireless network interface
#auto wlan0
#iface wlan0 inet dhcp

When I ping 8.8.8.8:

PING 8.8.8.8 (8.8.8.8) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=1 ttl=44 time=32.3 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=2 ttl=44 time=29.3 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=3 ttl=44 time=30.3 ms

route -n

0.0.0.0         192.168.1.2     0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth2
192.168.1.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth2

ifconfig -a

eth2      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 90:59:af:5c:f9:ca
      inet addr:192.168.1.101  Bcast:192.168.1.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
      inet6 addr: fe80::9259:afff:fe5c:f9ca/64 Scope:Link
      UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
      RX packets:463 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
      TX packets:182 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
      collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
      RX bytes:91607 (89.4 KiB)  TX bytes:14680 (14.3 KiB)
      Interrupt:56

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback
      inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
      inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
      UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:65536  Metric:1
      RX packets:2 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
      TX packets:2 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
      collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
      RX bytes:190 (190.0 B)  TX bytes:190 (190.0 B)

But when I ping google.com

ping: unknown host google.com

I can also ping other devices on network, but can't access internet.

Any idea what is wrong?

EDIT1:

cat /etc/resolv.conf

# Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by resolvconf(8)
#     DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE BY HAND -- YOUR CHANGES WILL BE OVERWRITTEN
nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.8.9

cat /etc/nsswitch.conf

# /etc/nsswitch.conf
#
# Example configuration of GNU Name Service Switch functionality.
# If you have the `glibc-doc-reference' and `info' packages installed, try:
# `info libc "Name Service Switch"' for information about this file.

passwd:         compat
group:          compat
shadow:         compat

hosts:          files dns
networks:       files

protocols:      db files
services:       db files
ethers:         db files
rpc:            db files

netgroup:       nis
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  • also give us output of grep dns /etc/nsswitch.conf Sep 9, 2013 at 14:42
  • If you can ping an IP address, then you are connected to the internet. What remains is to make DNS resolution work, as per answers below.
    – Jenny D
    Feb 25, 2014 at 8:52
  • Late to the party. Had a similar issue today on Debian 7, it ended up being the IP I was assigning it was outside my LAN range on the router. Changed it inside the range and it worked.
    – Jim
    Sep 7, 2014 at 23:29

3 Answers 3

1

You need to add your DNS settings to the /etc/resolv.conf file. If you edit the file to contain something like the following it should work:

nameserver 8.8.8.8
1

The secondary server is at is at 8.8.4.4, not 8.8.8.9.

0

In order for the dns-nameservers directive to work in /etc/network/interfaces you need to have a separate package resolvconf. You can check /etc/resolv.conf to see if the interfaces are there. If they are not, install the resolvconf package and restart the interface:

apt-get install resolvconf
ifdown eth2
ifup eth2
6
  • it should be default installed, isn't it ? Sep 9, 2013 at 14:40
  • @RahulPatil I have no idea what they install by default in their images. In stock Debian, it is not.
    – jordanm
    Sep 9, 2013 at 14:42
  • if dns not get resolve, then how package will install ? Sep 9, 2013 at 14:44
  • @RahulPatil by first performing the steps in Lorax's answer.
    – jordanm
    Sep 9, 2013 at 14:45
  • The resolvconf is installed. However the file /etc/resolv.conf says that I shouldn't edit it, but it's set correctly. I added cat /etc/resolv.conf in my question.
    – zdun8
    Sep 9, 2013 at 15:33

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