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I'm very new to ACL, and at the moment I've been trying to set up a shared folder such that any user belonging to a certain group (lets call it "thegroup") can have full access to the folder (which includes read, write, execute, and "creation" of files). When a user belonging to a group creates a file, the ownership should be automatically set to the user as well as "thegroup", and the file should be accessible in every single way by other members of the "thegroup". I'm not sure what the user ownership of the folder should be called so I just decided to set it to root.

https://wiki.debian.org/Permissions I've been following the instructions here but so far I can only list the files located in the directory as a normal user. I do not have read, write, or creation capabilities after doing the following commands:

mkdir folder
setfacl -m u:root:7 folder
setfacl -m -d u:root:7 folder
setfacl -m g:thegroup:7 folder
setfacl -m -d g:thegroup:7 folder

From what I understood, by setting the default ownership all the files that are created inside the folder should inherit the parent folder's permission, right? However, this doesn't seem to be the case.

Is there something I'm missing?

Note: the debian manual mentions that for each user that I want to add access to I have to explicitly add him to the ACL. I'm trying to avoid this by simply adding the user to a group, and then giving the group full access to the folder. Is this possible with ACL, or do I have no choice but to manually specify every user that's going to access the folder?

marked as duplicate by slm, Anthon, jasonwryan, Gilles, rahmu Aug 29 '13 at 22:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I think I may have solved my own question, but I'm not 100% sure I tried running this after doing the commands mentioned in my question: chmod -R 2770 folder, and it seems to do exactly what I need. I still need to test this however. – 9a3eedi Aug 29 '13 at 15:34