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I have bought a new Asus Rog Strix laptop, and I ran on it Windows for a month without any issue. After I changed OS and putted Fedora 37 on it. My laptop has an NVidia 3060 with 6 GB (and a Ryzen 7 40000 series), and I was expecting compatibility out of the box with Fedora, I was wrong. After installing Fedora everything seemed ok, and so I left the laptop on standby in a bag for a couple of hours, once I returned I found the laptop inside the bag really hot, with almost all the battery drained and an endless amount of system errors. I quickly restarted it, and installed all the proprietary drivers, and after that I have experienced, in the following moths of use, absolutely no problems. Seems that the missing proprietary drivers were the culprits.

Problem solved right? Kinda.. Since then I am afraid that the thermal spike could have damaged some of the hardware components. The laptop is working flawlessly as far I can tell from normal use, but I really would like to make sure that no hardware component was damaged during that incident. So my question is: how can I know if the thermal spike caused damage to my hardware?

This question I think naturally divides itself into two subquestions:

  • Is it possible for a laptop running Linux (Fedora) to fry itself in a couple of hours? Aren't there some hardware/BIOS/UEFI safety mechanisms to prevent that? (Even if closed in a bag)
  • What is the best battery of test to run on Fedora to check for thermal hardware damage? And how can we compare our performance versus new hardware?

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Since then I am afraid that the thermal spike could have damaged some of the hardware components.

This hasn't been possible for over a decade now. CPUs, GPUs and modern quality PSUs have built-in safeguards against overheating. They simply throttle or shut down on their own without you even being able to control that. There are multiple clips on YouTubes where people start their PCs without a cooler attached to the CPU. That results in nothing. They work regardless of your OS, or even if an OS is not installed. If those didn't exist, people would have fried their devices every day. This is not happening.

Contrary to the earlier answer, the OS does not shut down your system if your devices "overheat" unless you set it up to do so which is not enabled by default by either Windows, MacOS or Linux.

So my question is: how can I know if the thermal spike caused damage to my hardware?

I'm 99.999% positive it did nothing to your laptop. Overheating could have slightly reduced your battery capacity (maybe 0.05%) but not significantly. Millions of people use laptops/smartphones in extremely hot environments every day without anything to write home about.

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I don't think they should've close the query on superuser since it's probably more relevant there. If there was a detection of overheating, then the OS should shut-down the device automatically (see e.g. this example).

Your laptop (and most tech devices) have built-in protections from overheating (either by stopping the power or by slowing-down the CPU/GPU... or both). If it only happened once, then it probably did not harm anything.

If you want to check if some silicon has melted within the CPU - you could run some benchmark and compare to a brand new system - but, isn't it just the opposite of keeping the laptop in good condition?

If, for some reason, you want to do something after-the-fact, I would recommend replacing the thermal paste of the CPU/GPU(/NVME SSD, if any)'s thermal pad.

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