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Notepad++ has a feature where you simply right click on a text and select "hide lines", for example a base64 encoded jpeg in a markdown file, which is a large blob of text.

I have not encountered one gui text editor in linux that has the same feature, and I have looked a lot. Most editors can hide snippets of code with opening and closing brackets, but not a simple line of text.

Maybe you know one? Thanks. (GUI preferred, but I also take vim or emacs with some plugin?)

wall of text

poof,gone


@Marcus Müller: I want to hide elements of text (like a base64 image wall of characters) that distract me when editing markdown files. This is different from code folding (like markdown headers/chapters). I took a look at that wikipedia site with the text editor comparison and sublime text does support that feature:

sublime text fold

So for now I am somewhat happy. Most of the editors that allegedly support text folding according to the wikipedia site do not support that feature though. As you rightly point out code folding and text folding are two pairs of shoes.

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  • VS Code, SublimeText Oct 25, 2022 at 9:17
  • Bracket, for example. More info : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… hint: text folding
    – K-attila-
    Oct 25, 2022 at 10:05
  • I think folding is something different than the hiding that Chris wants. Chris, do you want to be able to hide arbitrary lines, or be able to "open" and "close" (fold and unfold) "logical sections" (like paragraphs in plain text, or the content of a <div> tag in HTML, or the body of a function in a programming language) within a document? Oct 25, 2022 at 15:34
  • In other words, is what is shown in this video snippet what you want? Oct 25, 2022 at 15:40

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Allright, thanks for the suggestions. I have digged into all the editors and those were the options I had for the feature I want:

  • notepad++ in Wine (this works decent to me surprise)
  • Sublime Text
  • emacs with fold-this

My choice fell to emacs since I want to dig into org mode anyway now.

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