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So i've got windows 10 installed on my 120G ssd and my hdd serves as the storage space. Now i want to dual boot arch but am confused about the partitions. My drives and partitions atm. I know that efi(on ssd) would need to be the same for both windows 11 & arch.However the other partitions (made on hdd) need ext4 formatting and everytime i do mkfs.ext4 or mkswap commands it shows they are in use. Please help me with the partitioning since all other posts are old and messed up.

This is what i've done:

  1. Make new partition using cfdisk on my /dev/sdb (hdd) for the home directories.
  2. Do mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb3 and mkswap /dev/sdb4. However, i get a result saying : apparantly the drive is in use by the system. and it cant be formatted.

I'd like ya'll to help m with this error.

Also, yes i'm sure about trying arch and i know it's the most complicated for beginners,however i want to conquer it once and not take the easy(ubuntu) way out.

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    We can't help if you don't show us any information. We need to know what your current partition setup is, what you want to change, the exact commands you're trying etc. Please edit your question and give us more details. Also, are you sure you want to use Arch? Arch is a brilliant distribution, but it is not very easy if you're not familiar with Linux, partitioning etc. You might want to consider starting with another distribution, one with a graphical installer and included partitioning tool (most of them have this, Arch is an exception).
    – terdon
    Nov 25 at 14:29
  • Edited. Sorry for the insolence.
    – NiMBuWaLLa
    Nov 26 at 3:37
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    Also, yes i'm sure about trying arch and i know it's the most complicated for beginners,however i want to conquer it once and not take the easy(ubuntu) way out. - Well that's not quite correct... if you learn by steps you will get a better understanding than just throwing yourself in at the deep end. You will learn much much more by installing Ubuntu 20 times (and each time increasing the complexity and/pr your tinkering slightly) than by attempting to complete a complex installation once (that probably won't work as you want it to and will require re-installing anyway). Nov 26 at 6:05

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