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What I have tried:

I have a spare hard drive in my computer that I installed Linux Mint (20.2 cinnamon 64 bit). Now I can boot to Windows (my main operating system) or Mint. Upon the fresh install, I was easily able to connect to the internet, I could download and install the system update flawlessly. After configuring my settings, I went to game on Windows for a while. When I booted back into Mint I was unable to access the internet. I have tried to solve this problem through traditional means of Google, but no no avail. I even tried restoring from a snapshot I created at the time of the fresh install. Nothing I have tried is getting me online though.

Current Configurations and Helpful (hopefully) Output:

*Network setting screenshot

Current Network Configuration Used (first image)

Current Network Configuration Used (second image)

$> arp -a
_gateway (192.168.0.1) at <incomplete> on eno1
$> cat /etc/resolv.conf

# This file is managed by man:systemd-resolved(8). Do not edit.
#
# This is a dynamic resolv.conf file for connecting local clients to the
# internal DNS stub resolver of systemd-resolved. This file lists all
# configured search domains.
#
# Run "resolvectl status" to see details about the uplink DNS servers
# currently in use.
#
# Third party programs must not access this file directly, but only through the
# symlink at /etc/resolv.conf. To manage man:resolv.conf(5) in a different way,
# replace this symlink by a static file or a different symlink.
#
# See man:systemd-resolved.service(8) for details about the supported modes of
# operation for /etc/resolv.conf.

nameserver 127.0.0.53
options edns0 trust-ad
$> cat /etc/network/interfaces

# interfaces(5) file used by ifup(8) and ifdown(8)
# Include files from /etc/network/interfaces.d:
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto eno1
iface eno1 inet static
    address 192.168.0.22
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.0.0
    broadcast 192.168.0.255
    #post-up iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.up.rules
    gateway 192.168.0.1
    dns-nameservers 192.168.0.22 8.8.8.8
$> ip addr

1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: eno1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether e0:3f:49:eb:23:b3 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.0.22/24 brd 192.168.0.255 scope global eno1
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 2601:845:c100:940:4053:8cea:72a7:901c/64 scope global dynamic mngtmpaddr noprefixroute 
       valid_lft 345591sec preferred_lft 345591sec
    inet6 fe80::c826:b952:2608:8ee2/64 scope link noprefixroute 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
$> cat /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf

[main]
plugins=ifupdown,keyfile

[ifupdown]
managed=true

[device]
wifi.scan-rand-mac-address=no
$> cat /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManagerconf.d/10-globally-managed-devices

[keyfile]
unmanaged-devices=none
$> nmcli d

DEVICE  TYPE      STATE      CONNECTION      
eno1    ethernet  connected  Ifupdown (eno1) 
lo      loopback  unmanaged  --              
$> cat /etc/nsswitch.conf

# /etc/nsswitch.conf
#
# Example configuration of GNU Name Service Switch functionality.
# If you have the `glibc-doc-reference' and `info' packages installed, try:
# `info libc "Name Service Switch"' for information about this file.

passwd:         files systemd
group:          files systemd
shadow:         files
gshadow:        files

hosts:          files mdns4_minimal [NOTFOUND=return] dns myhostname
networks:       files

protocols:      db files
services:       db files
ethers:         db files
rpc:            db files

netgroup:       nis
$> ping -c 10 8.8.8.8

PING 8.8.8.8 (8.8.8.8) 56(84) bytes of data.
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=1 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=2 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=3 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=4 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=5 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=6 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=7 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=8 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=9 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=10 Destination Host Unreachable

--- 8.8.8.8 ping statistics ---
10 packets transmitted, 0 received, +10 errors, 100% packet loss, time 9207ms
pipe 3
$> ping -c 10 192.168.0.1

PING 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=1 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=2 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=3 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=4 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=5 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=8 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=9 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.0.22 icmp_seq=10 Destination Host Unreachable

--- 192.168.0.1 ping statistics ---
10 packets transmitted, 0 received, +8 errors, 100% packet loss, time 9211ms
pipe 4
$> route -n

Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
0.0.0.0         192.168.0.1     0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eno1
169.254.0.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.0.0     U     1000   0        0 eno1
192.168.0.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eno1
3
  • What happens if you boot directly into Mint after a power cycle? Jul 16 at 3:01
  • It actually worked. I can't believe it. I've been trying to figure this out for 3 days straight. slinging config files left and right. Thank you. I guess the drivers Windows uses don't completely shut off unless there is a full power cycle. Thank you for the comment <3 Jul 16 at 3:45
  • Why is 192.168.0.22 [your PC] listed as a DNS server? Try replacing this with 1.1.1.1 Jul 16 at 12:06
0

The answer turned out to be...

  1. boot into BIOS

  2. set the HDD with Linux Mint to highest boot priority

  3. power off the computer

  4. boot directly into Linux

  5. Happy configs

(I guess the windows drivers don't completely forfeit their hold on the hardware, until the power cycle, so a reboot into Linux doesn't work.)

Thank you @Murray Jensen for the comment (:

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