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I'm running QEMU (6.0.0) on bspwm (Arch Linux), when i launch it alone on a workspace, like this:

________________________________________
| ____________________________________ |
| |                                  | | 
| |                                  | |
| |                                  | |
| |               QEMU               | |
| |                                  | |
| |                                  | |
| |                                  | |
| |__________________________________| |
|______________________________________|

It runs fine, the output is perfectly visible and nothing is blurred or strecthed

But, if i run it like this, and shortly after move it to another workspace that already has some other window on it, like this:

________________________________________
| _________________   ________________ |
| |                | |               | | 
| |                | |               | |
| |                | |               | |
| |    Terminal    | |      QEMU     | |
| |                | |               | |
| |                | |               | |
| |                | |               | |
| |________________| |_______________| |
|______________________________________|

It get's blurry and streched, barely readable

I'm running it with the following command:

qemu-system-x86_64 \
        -m 1G \
        -bios /usr/share/edk2-ovmf/x64/OVMF.fd \
        -drive file=storage.raw,format=raw,if=virtio \
        -cdrom "arch.iso" \
        -enable-kvm \
        -vga virtio \
        -display sdl,gl=on \
        -boot d \
        -cpu host \
        -k br-abnt2 \
        -name arch

I suspect that it might be the tty of the Arch ISO that i'm running setting locking the resolution accordingly to the QEMU window size on the initial stages of the boot, but i'm not sure, just a hypothesis

Any clue of what might be happening? or is it a intended behavior of QEMU?

I want to avoid tools/protocols like virt-manager, virsh or SPICE, i'm willing to keep things as simple as possible, with little to no abstraction levels

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