0

I have recently installed CentOS on my laptop which has two disks, SSD(32GB) + HDD(1TB). During installation I had set /boot(2GB) and /boot/efi(500MB) on SSD while rest all partitions on HDD. I want to utilize the leftover SSD for other compute intensive tasks but I don't see it fully.

Output of fdisk /dev/sdb + p command:

Command (m for help): p           

Disk /dev/sdb: 32.0 GB, 32017047552 bytes, 62533296 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: gpt
Disk identifier: 8807D20C-1A48-4014-85CA-FBFF7F8D2085


#         Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 1         2048       976895    476M  EFI System      EFI System Partition
 2       976896      5273599    2.1G  Microsoft basic 
 3      5273600     33902591   13.7G  Linux LVM

In the above output, it shows around 16GB. So How do I see the other invisible 16GB of SSD? And how do I group the two together(13.7GB + other invisible 16GB), so that I could have around 30GB of SSD for use.

4
  • what is the result of lsblk | grep sdb ?
    – Archemar
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 13:24
  • root@localhost software]# lsblk | grep sdb sdb 8:16 0 29.8G 0 disk ├─sdb1 8:17 0 476M 0 part /boot/efi ├─sdb2 8:18 0 2.1G 0 part /boot └─sdb3 8:19 0 13.7G 0 part
    – Hamid
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 14:56
  • 1
    you know you can edit original post with result from comands we ask you. ? Your HDD doesn't seems fully use either (600 GB / 1 TB). on sdb delete sdb3 and recreate it with max size from fdisk
    – Archemar
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 15:06
  • Ill go with CentOS reinstallation in single disk(HDD). and mount SSD after installation. Thanks for the help.
    – Hamid
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 15:58

1 Answer 1

1

How do I see the other invisible 16GB of SSD? And how do I group the two together(13.7GB + other invisible 16GB), so that I could have around 30GB of SSD for use.

You already see your other 16GB of SSD:

Disk /dev/sdb: 32.0 GB, 32017047552 bytes, 62533296 sectors

Since you are using LVM, extend the disk size with the pvresize. Check your disk linked to LVM with pvdisplay

pvresize /dev/sdb3

Then extend your logical volume, get the name with lvdisplay

lvextend -l 100%FREE <Name of your volume>

EDIT: The second have of your disk space is included in the Volume group (LVM) called Centos, with your HDD. So it's not missing, but you will not be able to select it for your computing as you need, unless your do your installation from scratch and redo the partitioning.

10
  • I ran commands and getting sdb3 not found. [root@localhost software]# pvresize /dev/sdb3 Physical volume "/dev/sdb3" changed 1 physical volume(s) resized or updated / 0 physical volume(s) not resized [root@localhost software]# lvdisplay /dev/sdb3 Volume group "sdb3" not found Cannot process volume group sdb3 [root@localhost software]#
    – Hamid
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 13:00
  • pvresize /dev/sdb3 Physical volume "/dev/sdb3" changed 1 physical volume(s) resized or updated just run lvdisplay, without other arguments. I should display a name in the output
    – Samuel PE
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 13:05
  • I can see three Logical Volume but none of them belong to SSD. They all belong to HDD. Perhaps I would need to make SSD LVM. LV Path-/dev/centos/swap, LV Name-swap. LV Path-/dev/centos/home, LV Name-home. LV Path-/dev/centos/root, LV Name-root.
    – Hamid
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 14:20
  • Can you give the result of vgdisplay and lvdisplay ?
    – Samuel PE
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 14:34
  • [root@localhost software]# vgdisplay --- Volume group --- VG Name centos System ID Format lvm2 Metadata Areas 2 Metadata Sequence No 10 VG Access read/write VG Status resizable MAX LV 0 Cur LV 3 Open LV 3 Max PV 0 Cur PV 2 Act PV 2 VG Size <673.42 GiB PE Size 4.00 MiB Total PE 172395 Alloc PE / Size 172393 / 673.41 GiB Free PE / Size 2 / 8.00 MiB VG UUID Jz1NG2
    – Hamid
    Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 14:39

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .