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This is the output from sensors on my machine, Ryzen 5 3600X on a Biostar B450MH:

amdgpu-pci-0a00
Adapter: PCI adapter
vddgfx:      725.00 mV
fan1:           0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM, max = 3630 RPM)
edge:         +45.0°C  (crit = +100.0°C, hyst = -273.1°C)
                       (emerg = +105.0°C)
junction:     +45.0°C  (crit = +110.0°C, hyst = -273.1°C)
                       (emerg = +115.0°C)
mem:          +46.0°C  (crit = +105.0°C, hyst = -273.1°C)
                       (emerg = +110.0°C)
power1:       10.00 W  (cap = 190.00 W)

acpitz-acpi-0
Adapter: ACPI interface
temp1:        +38.0°C  (crit = +127.0°C)

k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
Tctl:         +38.1°C
Tdie:         +38.1°C
Tccd1:        +39.5°C

I ran sensors-detect prior to this and allowed all checks to be made. Shouldn't k10temp be reporting individual core temperatures like coretemp for Intel CPUs?

1 Answer 1

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The k10temp driver only reports what it's capable of reporting and individual cores temperatures and wattage are not currently available/implemented. Patches are welcome (but that doesn't mean they will be merged).

Shouldn't k10temp be reporting individual core temperatures like coretemp for Intel CPUs?

No. "Should" doesn't apply to Linux drivers in any meaningful way as they are too often written without any input, support or specs from the OEM.

If you want full reporting you'll have to run Windows and HWiNFO64. The latter is a proprietary product, so again you cannot expect to ever see it ported under Linux. Even porting it to Linux would be problematic since it needs direct access to hardware and that often means you'll have to disable existing native drivers for the same hardware.

Here are two out of tree projects which provide a lot more data than k10temp:

It's unlikely you'll ever see them merged into the Linux kernel.

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