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I am trying to setup lvm on luks2 with boot inside lvm.

NAME                 FSTYPE       FSVER      FSAVAIL    FSUSE%  MOUNTPOINT
nvme0n1
├─nvme0n1p1          vfat         FAT32      510.7M     0%      /mnt/efi
└─nvme0n1p2          crypto_LUKS  2
  └─cryptlvm         LVM2_member  LVM2 001
    ├─ArchNVMe-swap  swap         1                             [SWAP]
    ├─ArchNVMe-root  ext4         1.0        27G        8%      /mnt
    └─ArchNVMe-home  ext4         1.0        395.5G     0%      /mnt/home

cryptomount works, and ls in grub rescue shows all the volumes, but it can't identify their filesystem (error: unknown filesystem), including ArchNVMe-root and nvme0n1p2. On wiki it says that it can happen if BIOS boot partition outside of the first 2TiB. But I didn't create BIOS boot partition because it also says that UEFI systems don't need one. I have tried with BIOS boot partition, it didn't change anything, still getting that error.

Thanks in advance.

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    Do you have GRUB's ext2.mod module loaded, or included in the main grubx64.efi binary? If you have Secure Boot enabled, it will allow loading of executable code only from signed UEFI/Windows PE binary formatted files... and GRUB uses the ELF binary format for its modules, so dynamic loading of GRUB modules is blocked by Secure Boot. The main grubx64.efi will be a UEFI/Windows PE-formatted binary so it can be signed to satisfy Secure Boot, but the modules can't be.
    – telcoM
    Apr 30, 2021 at 23:55
  • BIOS boot partition is only needed if you want to use the legacy BIOS version of GRUB, that is, GRUB architecture i386-pc. It is impossible to install a i386-pc GRUB to a GPT-partitioned disk without creating a BIOS boot partition first, so you probably have a native UEFI GRUB, i.e. GRUB architecture x86_64-efi, and it does not need the BIOS boot partition at all.
    – telcoM
    May 1, 2021 at 0:16

1 Answer 1

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Thanks to telcoM for their comment -- it appears that I didn't have ext2.mod loaded.

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