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OS: MX Linux 19.4

USB external HDD: Silicon Power 1TB HDD (reported as ST1000LM024 HN-M101MBB, size: 931.51 GiB, block size: physical: 512 B logical: 512 B, rotation: 5400 rpm in Quick System Info in MX).

Problem: GSmartControl utility can't recognize the HDD, checked /var/lib/smartmontools/drivedb/drivedb.h and there's no entry for ST1000LM024.

In smartmontools site, in the FAQ, there are instructions to add missing drive to the db (My ATA/SATA drive is not in the smartctl/smartd database), followed the instructions to run a short test smartctl -t short /dev/sdb. Here's the output:

$ sudo smartctl -t short /dev/sdb
smartctl 7.2 2020-12-30 r5155 [x86_64-linux-4.19.0-16-amd64] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-20, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
Read Device Identity failed: scsi error unsupported scsi opcode
A mandatory SMART command failed: exiting. To continue, add one or more '-T permissive' options.

When using hdparm command, got these output:

$ sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdb

/dev/sdb:
SG_IO: bad/missing sense data, sb[]:  70 00 05 00 00 00 00 0a 00 00 00 00 20 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

ATA device, with non-removable media
Standards:
    Likely used: 1
Configuration:
    Logical     max current
    cylinders   0   0
    heads       0   0
    sectors/track   0   0
    --
    Logical/Physical Sector size:           512 bytes
    device size with M = 1024*1024:           0 MBytes
    device size with M = 1000*1000:           0 MBytes 
    cache/buffer size  = unknown
Capabilities:
    IORDY not likely
    Cannot perform double-word IO
    R/W multiple sector transfer: not supported
    DMA: not supported
    PIO: pio0 

This is the output for $ sudo smartctl -i /dev/sdb

$ sudo smartctl -i /dev/sdb
smartctl 7.2 2020-12-30 r5155 [x86_64-linux-4.19.0-16-amd64] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-20, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
Read Device Identity failed: scsi error unsupported scsi opcode
A mandatory SMART command failed: exiting. To continue, add one or more '-T permissive' options.

The output for sudo smartctl -a -T permissive /dev/sdb

$ sudo smartctl -a -T permissive /dev/sdb
smartctl 7.2 2020-12-30 r5155 [x86_64-linux-4.19.0-16-amd64] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-20, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org

Read Device Identity failed: scsi error unsupported scsi opcode

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Device Model:     [No Information Found]
Serial Number:    [No Information Found]
Firmware Version: [No Information Found]
Device is:        Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]
ATA Version is:   [No Information Found]
Local Time is:    Sat Apr 24 21:03:53 2021 CEST
SMART support is: Ambiguous - ATA IDENTIFY DEVICE words 82-83 don't show if SMART supported.
SMART support is: Ambiguous - ATA IDENTIFY DEVICE words 85-87 don't show if SMART is enabled.
A mandatory SMART command failed: exiting. To continue, add one or more '-T permissive' options.

Am I missing something? Why the test showed access denied in my external drive? I'm not that familiar with Linux, so thought it better to ask before doing something stupid. Can someone guide me in the right direction, please?
ps: the make of the caddy is Silicon Power, can't find the model.

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  • 1
    I can't answer, but note that the FAQ says, "the essential drive health monitoring/testing functionality of smartmontools does not depend upon the database". Therefore there's something else wrong for you not to be able to self-test the drive. What's the make/model of the USB/HDD caddy? It may not support more than an absolute minimum of the command set (please add this to your question) – roaima Apr 24 at 13:54
  • At least 0x174c:0x55aa should be present in the database, see smartmontools.org/ticket/237. Not sure if you have the same USB adapter. Please add the output of sudo smartctl -i /dev/sdb to the question. – Freddy Apr 24 at 14:22
  • thanks for your comment, added the info in my original question. – michaelbr Apr 24 at 19:14
1

This

Read Device Identity failed: scsi error unsupported scsi opcode

and this

SG_IO: bad/missing sense data, sb[]:  70 00 05 00 00 00 00 0a 00 00 00 00 20 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

means your drive isn't reacting properly to some SCSI commands.

With a drive that supports SMART properly, it should look like this:

$ sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda
...
Commands/features:
    Enabled Supported:
       *    SMART feature set

As

To continue, add one or more '-T permissive' options.

suggest, you can add -T permissive or -T verypermissive to try to still get some output. Instead of starting a short test, do something like

$ sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda

to see all the SMART reports.

But SMART might just be broken for your drive.


SMART is a feature of the firmware on the harddrive. If the firmware of the harddrive isn't programmed to provide this feature, then it's just not available. Using a different Linux tool to access this won't make a difference. Nor does a database table entry make a difference.

That said, sometimes USB-to-SATA bridges which are used in many USB enclosures don't allow transmission of SMART commands. The way to test this is to open the enclosure, take the harddrive out, and directly connect the harddrive via SATA to the mainboard. If SMART works with that setup, then it's the bridge chip. If it doesn't, it's the harddrive.

smartctl also has the -d option to select workarounds for a number of devices where the bridge or some other issue blocks the SMART commands. See man smartctl. But I wouldn't recommend to use any of those unless you are reasonably sure that your hardware matches those devices.

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  • Thanks for your comment, one question, my HD is SATA, why it says SCSI commands? The output is too big for comment, I'll post it in my question. – michaelbr Apr 24 at 19:07
  • Because starting with ATAPI and continuing under SATA, the commands used for hard drives are SCSI commands. Even though the transport layer isn't SCSI. – dirkt Apr 24 at 20:31
  • And as man smartctl says, you can give multiple -T permissive or just one -T verypermissive options, but from the output so far it looks like SMART just isn't supported. – dirkt Apr 24 at 20:33
  • thanks for your comment, is there any other tool to test/check integrity of "not" SMART drives in Linux? What makes a drive "SMART"? The USB interface/caddy or the HD itself? – michaelbr Apr 25 at 7:19
  • thanks so much for your clarification. – michaelbr Apr 28 at 9:42

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