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I recently upgraded the harddrive from 20GB to 50Gb using the web interface of my cloud service.

But df -h:

  Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
  /dev/vda1        20G   19G   47M 100% /
  udev            488M  4.0K  488M   1% /dev
  tmpfs           200M  264K  199M   1% /run
  none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
  none            498M     0  498M   0% /run/shm
  none            100M     0  100M   0% /run/user

Clearly not a 50 GB partition.

fdisk -l gives:

Disk /dev/vda: 53.7 GB, 53687091200 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6527 cylinders, total 104857600 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00064eed

 Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/vda1   *        2048    41940991    20969472   83  Linux

Disk /dev/sda: 53.7 GB, 53687091200 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6527 cylinders, total 104857600 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00064eed

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 41940991 20969472 83 Linux

How do i proceed from here to make the partition a 50GB without loosing data.

OS is Ubuntu 12.10.

Update and "solution" After some help from the accepted solution i created mounted a new partition in the remaining 30GB free space and mounted it as my biggest subdirectory, /var:

Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/vda1        20G  7.7G   12G  42% /
udev            487M  4.0K  487M   1% /dev
tmpfs           200M  268K  199M   1% /run
none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none            498M     0  498M   0% /run/shm
none            100M     0  100M   0% /run/user
/dev/vda2        30G   13G   17G  43% /var

2 Answers 2

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If there's only one partition, do this:

  • fdisk /dev/<drive>
    • p - observe current partitions.
    • d - delete entire the partition.
    • n - make new primary partition #1. Make sure it spans the whole disk (I've been able to just accept all the defaults)
    • a - make that partition bootable again.
    • p - make sure it looks like the output of the first print.
    • If needed, use t to change the partition type to match first print.
    • If everything looks right, w to write changes.
  • resize2fs /dev/<drive>1.

These steps have worked for me every time for VMs on my XenServer cluster.

As always, if there's any really important data, make sure you have a recent backup.

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  • Doesn't the -d delete it? Does that mean lost data? And to be clear i should run fdisk with all the specified options?
    – CodeTower
    Commented Feb 2, 2013 at 23:42
  • You should be good to go as long as the output of the second print looks the same as the first print - difference being partition size. The data is still there, you're just overwriting the partition table. Things become a bit more complicated if you have multiple partitions or are using LVM. Commented Feb 3, 2013 at 0:30
  • Also, from Wikipedia, "When a partition is deleted, its entry is removed from a table and the data is no longer accessible. The data remains on the disk until being overwritten." - en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_partitioning#section_5 Commented Feb 3, 2013 at 0:31
  • Also, those weren't command line options I provided. Those are the commands you'd execute "in" fdisk. Commented Feb 3, 2013 at 0:47
  • Okay. Perhaps i will try on a random drive first. Would i know i had a LVM, since it is running from some virtualization software i have no clue of how works. At least i know i never installed some, and it is a one partition disk.
    – CodeTower
    Commented Feb 3, 2013 at 1:05
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If you are running an ubuntu-cloud image, it should have the cloud-init package installed by default, which should take care of this for you automatically.

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  • But what to do when it doesn't?
    – CodeTower
    Commented Feb 3, 2013 at 11:13

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