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As the wiki says, you can set a password for grub. Moreover, it seems to be possible to encrypt /boot. Moreover, I hear that bootloader can be made secure boot. Which method is the best way to focus on security and privacy?I'd also like to see the differences explained, if possible. t's a laptop.professional level protection against industrial espionage, or government secrets cuz I'd like to protect it at this level because there's so much seizure and state surveillance on interstate travel these days.

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  • It would be helpful if you could edit your question and give us a bit more detail about what sort of threat you are worried about. Things like whether this is a machine many people have access to, if it is a desktop or a laptop, and just generally what level of paranoia ("normal" person with an interest in basic privacy, or professional level protection against industrial espionage, or government secrets etc.).
    – terdon
    Oct 1 '20 at 17:42
  • thx answerd It's a laptop.professional level protection against industrial espionage, or government secrets cuz I'd like to protect it at this level because there's so much seizure and state surveillance on interstate travel these days.
    – hello arch
    Oct 1 '20 at 20:45
  • Please edit your question to include these details. Comments are easy to miss, hard to read and can be deleted without warning.
    – terdon
    Oct 1 '20 at 20:56
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If the hacker has (had) physical access to your system, you're f-ed regardless (think of hardware backdoors, changed bootloader, etc.). If you just want to protect your data from possible prying eyes, having a non-encrypted /boot will save you from a lot of unnecessary hassle.

My /boot and EFI system partitions are not encrypted but everything else is.

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