0
dpkg -l | grep -i libreoffice
rc  libreoffice-calc                     1:4.3.3-2+deb8u12                 amd64        office productivity suite -- spreadsheet
ii  libreoffice-common                   1:5.2.7-1+deb9u11                 all          office productivity suite -- arch-independent files
rc  libreoffice-core                     1:4.3.3-2+deb8u12                 amd64        office productivity suite -- arch-dependent files
ii  libreoffice-java-common              1:5.2.7-1+deb9u11                 all          office productivity suite -- arch-independent Java support files
ii  libreoffice-style-galaxy             1:5.2.7-1+deb9u11                 all          office productivity suite -- Galaxy (Default) symbol style
rc  libreoffice-writer                   1:4.3.3-2+deb8u12                 amd64        office productivity suite -- word processor
ii  uno-libs3                            5.2.7-1+deb9u11                   amd64        LibreOffice UNO runtime environment -- public shared libraries
ii  ure                                  5.2.7-1+deb9u11                   amd64        LibreOffice UNO runtime environment

libreoffice-calc, libreoffice-core and libreoffice-writer pkg are listed in the results of dpkg -l | grep -i libreoffice as removed. How can I install these packages?

4

Three packages are listed in the results of dpkg -l | grep -i libreoffice with rc flags meaning that these packages have been removed, but their configuration files have not been deleted. To install these removed packages open the terminal and type:

sudo apt purge libreoffice-core libreoffice-calc libreoffice-writer # remove old config files 
sudo apt update
sudo apt install libreoffice-core libreoffice-calc libreoffice-writer
| improve this answer | |
2

@karel gave a good link, which is https://askubuntu.com/questions/223237/unable-to-correct-problems-you-have-held-broken-packages

I'll write out what it says, just in case the page is removed later.

Try reinstalling the package with aptitude instead of apt install

You can try:

sudo aptitude install <packagename>

or:

sudo aptitude -f install <packagename>

aptitude in general will give up less easily. The difference between these commands is that -f will mean that aptitude will attempt to remove/downgrade less packages, even if it means not all changes will go ahead.

Edit: I'll add another solution, just in case this doesn't work.

Try sudo apt update OR try sudo apt autoremove

Hope it helps!

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for providing the attribution. – karel Jul 22 at 10:27
  • No problem. People deserve to be appreciated when they contribute something good. – fr0stbyte Jul 22 at 10:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy