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I'm managing a VPS server (I'm using Debian 10 Buster, the latest stable version), and I want to install the latest version of the essential web packages (for example: Apache 2.4.43, Bind 9.16.3), but when I use the default apt-repository, it installs a slightly old version (apache 2.4.38 and bind 9.11.5)..

I've found out that the version 2.4.43 of apache2 is only available for Debian Bullseye (testing version), but I don't want to install a testing version of Debian, I prefer stable versions.

In a nutshell: I want to install the "latest" version of apt packages (like apache2, bind9, postfix, etc.) without upgrading to an unstable version of Debian.

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2 Answers 2

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The reason Debian stable is called stable is because the software it contains, or rather, the external interfaces of all the individual pieces of software it contains, don’t change during its lifetime. A consequence of this is that, barring a few exceptions, packaged software isn’t upgraded to newer versions. So you can’t — in general — install packaged versions of newer software while remaining on Debian stable.

Some packages are however made available as backports, and the apache2 package is one of them. You can install these by enabling backports and selecting that as the source of upgrades:

echo deb http://deb.debian.org/debian buster-backports main | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/buster-backports.list
sudo apt update
sudo apt install -t buster-backports apache2

If other upgrades are already available in testing, and there’s a particularly relevant reason to upgrade, you can try filing bugs requesting a backport.

Note however that you should only upgrade to backports of packages if you have a specific reason to do so: backported packages don’t receive the same security support as packages in the stable repository, and while the stable distribution is tested as a coherent whole, no such testing is done with backports.

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#!/bin/bash
# To add this repository please do:

if [ "$(whoami)" != "root" ]; then
    SUDO=sudo
fi

${SUDO} apt-get -y install apt-transport-https lsb-release ca-certificates curl
${SUDO} wget -O /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/apache2.gpg https://packages.sury.org/apache2/apt.gpg
${SUDO} sh -c 'echo "deb https://packages.sury.org/apache2/ $(lsb_release -sc) main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/apache2.list'
${SUDO} apt-get update

# upgrade if you had the 2.4.38
apt-get upgrade -y

# If it wasn't already installed, at all
apt-get install apache2 -y 

source: https://packages.sury.org/apache2/README.txt from: https://deb.sury.org/

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