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During updating BIOS in my Lenovo laptop (T420), I have used dd to write bootable image to flash drive. I have accidentally used /dev/sdb (= SSD disc Samsung EVO) insread of /dev/sdc (= removable flash disc).

I don't care about data on SSD. My issue is that now SSD disc is not visible in Linux.

dmesg output:

[   14.199850] ata3.00: qc timeout (cmd 0x27)
[   14.201284] ata3.00: failed to read native max address (err_mask=0x4)
[   14.202667] ata3.00: HPA support seems broken, skipping HPA handling
[   14.519801] ata3: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[   14.521787] ata3.00: ACPI cmd ef/02:00:00:00:00:a0 (SET FEATURES) succeeded
[   14.521794] ata3.00: ACPI cmd f5/00:00:00:00:00:a0 (SECURITY FREEZE LOCK) filtered out
[   14.523200] ata3.00: ACPI cmd ef/10:03:00:00:00:a0 (SET FEATURES) filtered out
[   14.524786] ata3.00: supports DRM functions and may not be fully accessible
[   19.575847] ata3.00: qc timeout (cmd 0x47)
[   19.577266] ata3.00: READ LOG DMA EXT failed, trying PIO
[   19.578616] ata3.00: NCQ Send/Recv Log not supported
[   19.579947] ata3.00: ATA-9: Samsung SSD 850 EVO mSATA 250GB, EMT41B6Q, max UDMA/133
[   19.581278] ata3.00: 488397168 sectors, multi 1: LBA48 NCQ (depth 32), AA
[   19.582607] ata3.00: failed to get Identify Device Data, Emask 0x40
[   19.582608] ata3.00: ATA Identify Device Log not supported
[   19.583932] ata3.00: Security Log not supported
[   19.585255] ata3.00: failed to set xfermode (err_mask=0x40)
[   19.586571] ata3: limiting SATA link speed to 1.5 Gbps
[   19.587870] ata3.00: limiting speed to UDMA/133:PIO3
[   19.903876] ata3: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 310)
[   19.905689] ata3.00: ACPI cmd ef/02:00:00:00:00:a0 (SET FEATURES) succeeded
[   19.905696] ata3.00: ACPI cmd f5/00:00:00:00:00:a0 (SECURITY FREEZE LOCK) filtered out
[   19.906973] ata3.00: ACPI cmd ef/10:03:00:00:00:a0 (SET FEATURES) filtered out
[   19.908418] ata3.00: supports DRM functions and may not be fully accessible
[   24.951832] ata3.00: qc timeout (cmd 0x2f)
[   24.953072] ata3.00: NCQ Send/Recv Log not supported
[   24.954219] ata3.00: failed to get Identify Device Data, Emask 0x40
[   24.954219] ata3.00: ATA Identify Device Log not supported
[   24.955337] ata3.00: Security Log not supported
[   24.956442] ata3.00: failed to set xfermode (err_mask=0x40)
[   24.957521] ata3.00: disabled
[   25.275901] ata3: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 310)

What I've found so far:

  • BIOS sees disk, but it takes several minutes only BIOS to get to boot menu
  • live linux doesn't create /dev/sdX for SSD disc (with dmesg atached)
  • Hiren’s (Win10 Based) BootUSB, AHCI mode in BIOS - booting about 35minutes
  • Hiren’s (Win10 Based) BootUSB, IDE mode in BIOS - booting about 2minutes
  • the most partition tools (from Hiren’s, GParted, and others) doesn't see the SSD disc at all
  • few partition tools see the SDD disc but can't create/delete/change anything, some of them indicate partition table error
  • diskmgmt.msc from Hiren’s (Win10 Based) BootUSB see the SSD disc only with AHCI in BIOS, in such case offer initialization disk with MBR or GPT, both failed with some IO error
  • Samsung SSD EVO update firmware live USB - can't see disc (linux based)

Is it possible to permanently destroy SSD disc with dd command?

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No, your physical disk cannot be destroyed by dd. Edge cases only, to wear it out, if it's long used and you've written the last straw of data on it using dd. On the other hand, the data and partition info can be destroyed indeed, and it seems so in your case!

After you reboot, on your linux system try this:

Beware, parted acts immediately after pressing enter, unlike fdisk which expects a write command.

sudo parted /dev/sdb (or whichever is your Samsung EVO disk)

mklabel loop (essentially remove any kind of partition table)

At this point you can leave it completely blank and try to reboot to see if the delays etc have stopped or continue to partitioning the disk.

You can also leave loop, do not make any partition and mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb It's a bit of a novelty but it's possible.

But more probably you'll define a partition table,

mklabel gpt (on efi systems)

mklabel msdos (on bios systems)

And make a partition

mkpart (you can follow the wizard at this point. Select primary if it's msdos-mbr table, ext4 filesystem, start 0%, end 100%)

print (view the new partition)

Exit parted,

and finally mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb1

If of course you want to have ext4 file system.

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