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I'm running MX Linux and Windows on the same machine. I'm using an LCD television screen connected via HDMI to the graphics card (NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER).

My problem:

  • On Windows, I can select resolutions way higher than 1024x768 (i.e. 1920x1080 and above).
  • However, on MX Linux, 1024x768 is the highest resolution (800x600 and 640x480 are also selectable).
  • Display settings in MX Linux only show one screen labelled "default".

I tried:

  • using xrandr as described here.
    • "xrandr --newmode (...)" gives the error(/warning?): "Failed to get size of gamma for output default".
    • "xrandr --addmode default "1920x1080_60.00"" also gives "Failed to get size of gamma for output default".
    • "xrandr --output default --mode "1920x1080_60.00"" gives the additional message: "Configure crtc 0 failed".
    • no change in display happened after that.
  • using arandr (GUI) after typing the above commands:
    • "default" is shown as screen
    • right-click --> resolution: shows the 3 resolutions mentioned above, and also "1920x108060.00"
    • selecting "1920x108060.00" and hitting the check sign --> pop-up error message: "(...) error code 1: xrandr: Failed to get size of gamma for output default" and "xrandr: Configure crtc 0 failed".
    • no change in display happened after that.

I would appreciate any help. It is kind of inconvient having to work with this low (and stretched!) resolution on a 42'' LCD TV screen ;)

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The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 aka. NV166 is very new. The Debian-supplied driver "nouveau" does not really support it, yet as can be inferred from the Feature Matrix.

You need to install the drivers for your graphics card. I strongly recommend using a package supplied by your distribution – not the installer from nvidia.com. The package list suggests, there is a pre-built package nvidia-driver in MX Linux. It looks like you need version 418 or newer.

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