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I'm having a big issue here and I can't access or mount my HD. First, I will explain what happened. I have a notebook with a 240GB SSD where are stored two operational systems (Windows 10 and Linux Mint). Furthermore, I have a 1TB HD which had five partitions: a partition where is pointed Linux /boot (I don't know why is it stored on HD and not on my SSD), 3 data partitions and another partition about 128mb size that I don't know what is it about.

Yesterday I tried to clean up this mess, so I transformed these 3 data partitions into a single NTFS partition. Well, after that, I was not able to access or mount my data partition on HD anymore (just on Linux), I was receiving this message:

mount: /mnt/Data: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sda2, missing codepage or helper program, or other error.[/code]

However, I was able to access that partition through Windows 10. So I opened Windows' Partition Manager and I saw that my data partition (that resulted from the merge of that 3 partitions) was appearing like a "giant" partition divided into three (but it still was a single partition). I though that this was causing "super bad block" problem.

In that moment, I had just three partitions on my HD: /boot partition, data partition and the 128mb partition. So I decided to delete that 128mb and resize my data partition to cover that free space. But for a unknown reason, I was unable to do that (Image 1 shows what appears on GParted). After that, I was unable to access or mount this data partition on Windows too. It shows that I have a dynamic invalid disk (Image 2).

However, I still can boot my computer, since my boot partition is on my inaccessible HD.

Here are some information I think might be useful for you.

/dev/sda: my 1T HD (inaccessible)

/dev/sda1: /boot partition

/dev/sda2: data partition (3 partitions merged into one)

/dev/sdb: my 240GB SSD

/dev/sdb2: Windows 10

/dev/sda5: Linux Mint

sudo fdisk -l output:

Disk /dev/loop0: 89,1 MiB, 93417472 bytes, 182456 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop1: 67,6 MiB, 70844416 bytes, 138368 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop2: 137,7 MiB, 144363520 bytes, 281960 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop3: 181,1 MiB, 189870080 bytes, 370840 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop4: 173,4 MiB, 181846016 bytes, 355168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/sda: 931,5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: BDC807D4-A466-472B-AB1F-F9BD1D3D92A4

Device       Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1     2048    4892671    4890624   2,3G EFI System
/dev/sda2  4892672 1953262990 1948370319 929,1G Microsoft LDM data


Disk /dev/sdb: 223,6 GiB, 240057409536 bytes, 468862128 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 488DE50E-CA02-4188-A8BA-BFBE94AA6D27

Device         Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sdb1       2048    264191    262144   128M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sdb2     264192 262797671 262533480 125,2G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sdb3  262799360 264060927   1261568   616M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sdb4  264062976 265113599   1050624   513M EFI System
/dev/sdb5  265113600 426919935 161806336  77,2G Linux filesystem
/dev/sdb6  426919936 468860927  41940992    20G Microsoft basic data

sudo blkid output:

/dev/sda1: UUID="0DB9-B011" TYPE="vfat" PARTUUID="fe734bc3-5680-46ad-bc53-8f876decf806"
/dev/sdb2: LABEL="Windows SSD" UUID="483A6E3A3A6E2562" TYPE="ntfs" PARTLABEL="Basic data partition" PARTUUID="35bbc920-7232-43e5-b532-00d1c54fb794"
/dev/sdb3: LABEL="P2 SSD" UUID="A4F2E807F2E7DB94" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="75b4f1a5-2a74-4fc7-9596-2c2e443e4a8e"
/dev/sdb4: LABEL="P3 SSD" UUID="E5A6-210F" TYPE="vfat" PARTLABEL="EFI System Partition" PARTUUID="29b24382-886e-4a49-a0aa-32b98a62b083"
/dev/sdb5: UUID="533ea09a-307d-4b10-a6b2-faf4aa228b53" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="bebe8d5b-8fd3-4b2a-acfa-fb3b6ea92ea0"
/dev/sdb6: UUID="DEAE8FFDAE8FCC89" TYPE="ntfs" PARTLABEL="Basic data partition" PARTUUID="1c19b35d-09be-485a-b29b-4e1b05aea3e6"
/dev/loop0: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop1: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop2: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop3: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/loop4: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/sda2: PARTLABEL="LDM data partition" PARTUUID="2f4de199-3eea-11ea-98b5-681729feaf96"
/dev/sdb1: PARTLABEL="Microsoft reserved partition" PARTUUID="dec170f4-3c3c-47fe-af7c-f86a8576e499"

Error when executing sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt:

mount: /mnt/Data: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sda2, missing codepage or helper program, or other error.

Image 1 (Windows' Partition Manager): https://ibb.co/LNQMSH6

Image 2 (GParted): https://ibb.co/4NXRrPx

Thank you so much!

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Ok, I'm not sure why this hasn't been answered yet, as it is straight forward. So I'll just throw this out here.

/dev/sda2  4892672 1953262990 1948370319 929,1G Microsoft LDM data

is a Microsoft dynamic disk. GNU mount cannot handle it, as it doesn't understand the file system type. You will need to install ldmtool.

#[bash]: ldmtool create all

Will create a GNU mount understandable link under /dev/mapper that you can mount as normal.

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  • Oh, I missed that you used GParted to delete the 128 MB partition. Yeah, Windows needs that as it contains logical volume information. Similar to deleting the volume group information in an LVM, the data is still on the disk, but you've removed the pointers that let the OS know how to deal with it. Linux should still be able to mount it with ldmtool, but you'll need to copy the information off and rebuild the logical volume in Windows to get the drive back. Or partition as a simple / basic volume instead. Either way, use Linux to copy the info off and re-partition the drive. – Matakaheru Mar 10 '20 at 12:48
  • Welcome to the site, and thank you for your contribution. Instead of commenting on your own answer, please edit it if you think it needs to be amended. – AdminBee Mar 10 '20 at 13:12

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