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For example in my .Xresources I have a line URxvt.keysym.Control-Left: \033[1;5C. I don't know very well what \033[1;5C means, but by having bindkey "^[[1;5C" forward-word in my .zshrc it allows me to walk left a word in terminal which is useful.

Because I use vim, I wanted to map ctrl+w to delete a "word" and ctrl+shift+w to delete a "WORD". If I add URxvt.keysym.C-W: something in .Xresources , pressing ctrl+shift+w will write something. What can I put in that something? I'm thinking maybe I should put some symbols like \033[1;5C so I can refer to them in .zshrc, but I don't know what those symbols mean and don't want to bind some wrong key combination and press it by accident.

So what does something of the form \033[1;5C mean and where can I read about it? And what can I put so it doesn't conflict?

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It has no meaning for rxvt/urxvt, but is copied from xterm's alt/meta key definitions. In that context, it means controlRight-cursor:

                Code     Modifiers
              ---------+---------------------------
                 2     | Shift
                 3     | Alt
                 4     | Shift + Alt
                 5     | Control
                 6     | Shift + Control
                 7     | Alt + Control
                 8     | Shift + Alt + Control
                 9     | Meta
                 10    | Meta + Shift
                 11    | Meta + Alt
                 12    | Meta + Alt + Shift
                 13    | Meta + Ctrl
                 14    | Meta + Ctrl + Shift
                 15    | Meta + Ctrl + Alt
                 16    | Meta + Ctrl + Alt + Shift
              ---------+---------------------------

              Key            Normal     Application
              -------------+----------+-------------
              Cursor Up    | CSI A    | SS3 A
              Cursor Down  | CSI B    | SS3 B
              Cursor Right | CSI C    | SS3 C
              Cursor Left  | CSI D    | SS3 D
              -------------+----------+-------------

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