1

This is a similar question to this one

I want to do the word count but this time, using an array.

For example, I have the following IPs inside a bash array called IPS.

IPS=("1.1.1.1" "5.5.5.5" "3.3.3.3" "1.1.1.1" "2.2.2.2" "5.5.5.5" "1.1.1.1")

If I read its contents:

user@server~$ "${IPS[*]}"
1.1.1.1 5.5.5.5 3.3.3.3 1.1.1.1 2.2.2.2 5.5.5.5 1.1.1.1

I would like to have something similar to this:

3 1.1.1.1
2 5.5.5.5
1 3.3.3.3
1 2.2.2.2

2 Answers 2

3

try:

printf '%s\n' "${IPS[@]}" |sort |uniq -c |sort -rn |sed 's/^ *//'
3 1.1.1.1
2 5.5.5.5
1 3.3.3.3
1 2.2.2.2

related:

0
1

You can use an associative array to store the different IPS as keys which will increment when iterating over the IPS array.

#!/bin/bash
IPS=("1.1.1.1" "5.5.5.5" "3.3.3.3" "1.1.1.1" "2.2.2.2" "5.5.5.5" "1.1.1.1")
declare -A arr
for ip in ${IPS[@]};
do
        ((arr[${ip}]++))
done
for k in ${!arr[@]};
do
        echo "${arr[$k]} $k"
done | sort -rn
1
  • Note that that ((arr[${ip}]++)) is an arbitrary command execution vulnerability if the contents of $ip/$IPS is not under your control (try for instance ip='$(uname>&2)x' bash -c 'typeset -A arr; ((arr[${ip}]++))'). You'd want arr[$ip]=$((${arr[$ip]} + 1)) here to avoid it. Sep 30, 2019 at 12:25

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