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I am a very novice administrator. Building my own production environment is my target. Which will be similar to professional ones.

I wonder if it is better to install critical applications from the source or through the package manager. My idea is: - compilation from the source with rpmbuild, then install the rpm package, then upgrade from repositories (via yum).

I wonder if my configuration will be taken into account when upgrading the package by yum.

./configure --enable-ssl --enable-so --enable-http2 --with-mpm = event --with-included-apr --with-ssl = / usr / local / openssl --prefix = / usr / local / apache2

  • Is the package you're trying to install from source either: 1.) a newer version than the version in the repository, or 2.) Not in the repository? – eyoung100 Sep 23 at 22:10
  • If you have no real reason to, I would avoid rebuilding yourself from source. yum install is way faster and easier. – Chris Maes Sep 24 at 10:39
  • 1) I know it is easier, but I think that thanks to the compilation, I can adapt the software better. What's your opinion ? 2) No, the software is not newer than the one contained in the official repositories. – varavell Sep 25 at 6:48
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If you have no real reason to, I would avoid rebuilding yourself from source. yum install is way faster and easier.

Second: if you run something like

./configure
make
make install

then those files will not be taken into account by the rpm database; so rpm (and hence yum) won't know that those files exist.

  • to my knowledge, if I build my own .rpm (with rpmbuild), then install it, it will be in the database. Am I wrong? I just wonder if the settings from ./configure will not be changed to default ones after the upgrade. For the record, I am writing about critical applications. – varavell Sep 25 at 7:01
  • if you build your own rpm, then the files will be in the database, yes. – Chris Maes Sep 25 at 7:04
  • What happens to my settings after the upgrade? – varavell Sep 25 at 7:28
  • I don't understand that question. an rpm packages files, not settings... – Chris Maes Sep 25 at 7:29
  • according to this guide in the section% build CFLAGS = "$ RPM_OPT_FLAGS" ./configure --prefix =% {_ prefix} --mandir =% {_ mandir} --sysconfdir = / etc I can include my own options. thegeekstuff.com/2015/02/rpm-build-package-example – varavell Sep 25 at 17:44

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