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I have 2 problems.

1- My Internal HDD isnt 230GB totally. I want to extend and use remaining internal hdd too. How can i do it?

2- I unconsciously removed or unmounted removable hard drive before, weeks ago. I see it like its already plugged in my computer all the time but its not. Its physically not plugged in. I want to make it disappear and see it when i plug it in.

Here it is some of my outputs.

tayfun@tayfun-G3-3579:~$ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/loop0: 54,4 MiB, 57069568 bytes, 111464 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop1: 407,1 MiB, 426876928 bytes, 833744 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop2: 89 MiB, 93327360 bytes, 182280 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop3: 88,7 MiB, 92983296 bytes, 181608 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop4: 407,2 MiB, 426958848 bytes, 833904 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop5: 42,8 MiB, 44879872 bytes, 87656 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop6: 54,4 MiB, 57065472 bytes, 111456 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop7: 201,3 MiB, 211075072 bytes, 412256 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 238,5 GiB, 256060514304 bytes, 500118192 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: A564F949-BDD2-4CF1-853E-031C086D872B

Device           Start       End   Sectors  Size Type
/dev/nvme0n1p1    2048   1050623   1048576  512M EFI System
/dev/nvme0n1p2 1050624 500117503 499066880  238G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/sda: 931,5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 7C9BFAC9-B57D-41A0-B2D3-02AF97BF54F8

Device     Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1   2048 1953523711 1953521664 931,5G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/loop8: 35,3 MiB, 37027840 bytes, 72320 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop9: 193,1 MiB, 202481664 bytes, 395472 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

df -h

tayfun@tayfun-G3-3579:~$ df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev            7,8G     0  7,8G   0% /dev
tmpfs           1,6G  2,1M  1,6G   1% /run
/dev/nvme0n1p2  234G  220G  1,4G 100% /
tmpfs           7,8G  374M  7,4G   5% /dev/shm
tmpfs           5,0M  4,0K  5,0M   1% /run/lock
tmpfs           7,8G     0  7,8G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/nvme0n1p1  511M   31M  481M   7% /boot/efi
/dev/loop1      408M  408M     0 100% /snap/redis-desktop-manager/328
/dev/loop0       55M   55M     0 100% /snap/core18/1098
/dev/loop2       90M   90M     0 100% /snap/core/7713
/dev/loop4      408M  408M     0 100% /snap/redis-desktop-manager/327
/dev/loop5       43M   43M     0 100% /snap/gtk-common-themes/1313
/dev/loop3       89M   89M     0 100% /snap/core/7396
/dev/loop6       55M   55M     0 100% /snap/core18/1144
/dev/loop8       36M   36M     0 100% /snap/gtk-common-themes/1198
/dev/loop7      202M  202M     0 100% /snap/hiri/56
tmpfs           1,6G   56K  1,6G   1% /run/user/1002
/dev/loop9      194M  194M     0 100% /snap/mailspring/374
/dev/sda1       916G   77M  870G   1% /media/tayfun/af7ac763-b0ca-4314-a066-cfc45995129d

lsblk

tayfun@tayfun-G3-3579:~$ lsblk
NAME        MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
loop0         7:0    0  54,4M  1 loop /snap/core18/1098
loop1         7:1    0 407,1M  1 loop /snap/redis-desktop-manager/328
loop2         7:2    0    89M  1 loop /snap/core/7713
loop3         7:3    0  88,7M  1 loop /snap/core/7396
loop4         7:4    0 407,2M  1 loop /snap/redis-desktop-manager/327
loop5         7:5    0  42,8M  1 loop /snap/gtk-common-themes/1313
loop6         7:6    0  54,4M  1 loop /snap/core18/1144
loop7         7:7    0 201,3M  1 loop /snap/hiri/56
loop8         7:8    0  35,3M  1 loop /snap/gtk-common-themes/1198
loop9         7:9    0 193,1M  1 loop /snap/mailspring/374
sda           8:0    0 931,5G  0 disk 
└─sda1        8:1    0 931,5G  0 part /media/tayfun/af7ac763-b0ca-4314-a066-cfc45995129d
nvme0n1     259:0    0 238,5G  0 disk 
├─nvme0n1p1 259:1    0   512M  0 part /boot/efi
└─nvme0n1p2 259:2    0   238G  0 part /
  • internal disk (230 Gb) is mounted on /, while external (sda ~ 930 G) is on /media/tayfun/.... you want /dev/sda1 mounted elsewhere ? – Archemar Sep 17 '19 at 14:48
  • dont i have more space than 230GB internal? I thought its 1TB laptop and 770GB is missing. I'm searching for it. – Tayfun Yaşar Sep 18 '19 at 6:55
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/dev/nvme0n1 is a NVMe SSD, not a HDD. If there is no external HDD physically plugged in (and wasn't when you last rebooted the system), /dev/sda might be your internal HDD after all.

Would "1 TB HDD and 256 GB SSD" match the sales description of what your hardware is supposed to have? (238.5 GiB = 256 GB, and 931.5 GiB = 1000 GB = 1 TB)

The OS does not necessarily know for sure whether a particular HDD is internal or external: since it is apparently initialized with a Linux filesystem of some type but otherwise unused by the OS, your desktop environment may auto-mount it for you to /media/<your username>/<filesystem UUID>, on the assumption that it is an external removable disk... an assumption that may not be correct.

It might be that you've accidentally installed your Linux OS on the SSD only, and left the HDD completely unused.

  • I didnt even know that /media/$username/$uid is my internal hdd. Thanks! I gave write permission to that directory and started to use it. Thanks a lot. – Tayfun Yaşar Sep 18 '19 at 14:31
  • That can happen to any internal disk that is left unused when installing Linux. You can definitely use it as-is, but you could also easily move it to another path more convenient for you: unmount it, add a line to /etc/fstab describing where you want your /dev/sda1 mounted, and make sure there is an empty directory in that location, which will act as a mount point for it, then run mount -a. – telcoM Sep 18 '19 at 14:38
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It is already mounted on mount point /media/tayfun/af7ac763-b0ca-4314-a066-cfc45995129d.

  • But its not physically plugged in. It always says the same. I dont even plug it in. There is a problem with it. And i have one more problem. The other one is my internal hdd isnt 230 GB totally. I need that disappeared storage too. – Tayfun Yaşar Sep 18 '19 at 6:57
  • Can you unmount it manually to "make it disappear"? Can you show somehow the 1 TB of your internal drive? When fdisk says "Disk /dev/nvme0n1: 238,5 GiB" and you say 1000 GB, then there must be a nvme0n2 around. – user370539 Sep 18 '19 at 7:58
  • nvme0n2 would mean "NVMe device 0 namespace 2". Using enterprise-grade NVMe devices with support for multiple namespaces would be rather unlikely for a laptop, and configuring the NVMe device to actually use multiple namespaces would require the use of nvme create-ns command, which is so specialized that the OP would certainly have to be aware of it if they've done it themselves. Having a second NVMe device (as /dev/nvme1n1) would be more likely: in fact I currently have a laptop with two internal NVMe devices like that. – telcoM Sep 18 '19 at 9:04

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