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I'm not sure if this is a "unix" question, but I'm in dire straits:

I'm running Mint 18.1 Serena 64bit. I'm trying to burn a Windows 10 ISO to a USB drive so that I can boot from it via selecting it in the boot order. I've just downloaded the ISO straight from Microsoft and opened a brand new Sandisk 32gb flash drive.

I burned the ISO by right clicking the ISO and selecting Make bootable USB disk and selecting the SanDisk. It took a while and succeeded with no error message or anything.

When I restart my computer and put the USB stick to the top of the boot order, it tries to boot, but immediately prompts me in motherboard-like text, "No partition active." It then goes to Linux Mint, installed on my SSD drive.

Are there any commands I can use to check the health of this disk? Is the MBR?

I notice in the below output that the USB stick at /dev/sdc/ does not have a Device section. Is that noteworthy?

homebase matt # fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 232.9 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xb5eeff05

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *         2048 454987775 454985728  217G 83 Linux
/dev/sda2       454989822 488396799  33406978   16G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       454989824 488396799  33406976   16G 82 Linux swap / Solaris




Disk /dev/sdb: 931.5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: B3D4D98E-D2D1-4820-B91D-508888A104EC

Device      Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sdb1    2048     206847     204800   100M EFI System
/dev/sdb2  206848     468991     262144   128M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sdb3  468992 1953523711 1953054720 931.3G Microsoft basic data


Disk /dev/sdc: 28.7 GiB, 30752636928 bytes, 60063744 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

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Turns out Linux has a hard time making an a USB bootable with a Windows ISO. I used woeusb and was able to create the USB correctly.

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  • ISO images need to be specially prepared (with isohybrid or something similar) to be functional after writing to an USB drive. Microsoft does not seem to use this technology; instead, they supply a Windows executable MediaCreationTool.exe which will download the actual media and write the files within to the USB stick in an appropriate way.
    – telcoM
    Commented Sep 1, 2019 at 7:21

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