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I'm a research student whose work involves processes, and I had a question about Linux's task list.

From what I understand, as long as the computer has booted up, it is accepting processes. The processes it accepts can be created from anywhere. How does it do this? I'm having trouble imagining how it manages to be all accepting and ever running in Linux.

I'm still new to Linux, so I apologize if I'm being ignorant. Thank you in advance!

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    You should probably read an introductory textbook on Operating Systems (e.g. the first couple of chapters of Tanenbdaum and Woodhull covers processes, but just about any textbook should be fine).
    – NickD
    Commented Jun 14, 2019 at 1:06
  • ... Then you can look at a Linux-specific book to see how things differ there: one example is Love.
    – NickD
    Commented Jun 14, 2019 at 1:09
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    ... Even before these, looking at how a user program accesses the facilities that the OS provides might be even more helpful: some examples would be Kernighan &Pike, Stevens or Rochkind.
    – NickD
    Commented Jun 14, 2019 at 1:17

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The first process linux creates is the swapper process that creates init process that(after some other work it does) start a login process to a specific terminal.from there other processes gets created via former processes that issues fork() like system calls(fork,clone,vfork...).

in addition the linux kernel itself have few threads that called kernel threads they are created by the kernel itself and(obviously) their task_structs also reside in the task list

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