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And if yes, how good* are they?

I like to use Tiling Window Managers but I do not like to configure everything from scratch. I already use Manjaro-i3 and it is pretty nice. Right now I am interested in using DWM and Emacs XWM (EXWM).

Edit: *: In my case for the term 'good' you can think of criteria like stability, up-to-date'ness, amount of people supporting it (like a large userbase or funding by industry) and avoidance of bloat while still having all basic tools to be used as a regular laptop main OS.

  • I don't think many distros operate in providing a pre-configured twm setup because most users end up changing the configuration to suit their needs. I expect that most twm users choose a distro based upon what they want from an init system and package manager. Instead of seeking out a distro with a window manager configuration, I suggest seeking out the configuration/dotfiles/patches that suit your needs. Luke Smith (lukesmith.xyz) has been sharing his dotfiles in an arch/i3 setup but will be transitioning to void/dwm. You may look elsewhere for people implementing emacs. – T. Zack Crawford Jun 6 at 16:57
  • Ok, thank you for that insight. – Tillus Jun 6 at 17:03
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Two dwm-based distros were found:

ArchLabs Linux, a distribution based on Arch Linux, a 64-bit, rolling release distribution which provides a live DVD. The distribution can be installed using the AL-Installer system installer.

Tiny Core Linux, a 12 MB graphical Linux desktop based on a recent Linux kernel, BusyBox, Tiny X, Fltk, and Flwm. The core runs entirely in memory and boots very quickly. The user has complete control over which applications and/or additional hardware to have supported, be it for a desktop, a nettop, an appliance or server; selectable from the project's online repository.

No distros relying on EXWM were found.

No opportunity to delve into the 'goodness' of the two qualifying distros, I'm afraid.

Thanks to Distrowatch.com for their search engine which made this task quicker.

  • By good in my case you can think of criteria like stability, uptodate-ness, amount of people supporting it (like a large userbase or funding by industry) and avoidance of bloat while still having all basic tools. – Tillus Jun 6 at 16:17

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