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My laptop ran out of power and when I went to plug it in and power it on, Ubuntu no longer boots. I get directed to BusyBox built in shell that looks exactly like:

BusyBox v1.27.2 (Ubuntu 1:1.27.2-2ubuntu4.1) built-in shell (ash)
Enter 'help'for a list of built-in commands.

(initramfs)

When I type in exit, the following output is dumped:

mount: mounting /sys on /root/sys failed: No such file or directory
mount: mounting /proc on /root/proc failed: No such file or directory
/init: line 355: can't open /root/dev/console: no such file
_

I've had a look at this article to see if it could help me out, which prompted me to dumpe2fs /dev/sda2 | grep superblockwhich dumped the following output:

dumpe2fs: Bad magic number in super-block while trying to open /dev/sda2
Couldn't find valid filesystem superblock

How can I boot my Ubuntu based OS again?

marked as duplicate by Rui F Ribeiro, Kiwy, DarkHeart, meuh, X Tian May 23 at 13:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • You probably have a disk problem and need to troubleshoot that with a bootable disk... get an unbuntu live iso and burn it to a usb disk and boot on it to troubleshoot your disk... also have a look at unix.stackexchange.com/questions/519745 there are some useful infos there – intika May 19 at 4:17
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Resolved on 22.05.19

I've looked into this question that my post was marked as a possible duplicated and it did not help my cause.

I managed to fix the issue following these steps and resources:

  1. My disk was encrypted so after I decrypted it, I was encountering an error while trying to mount it: mount: unknown file system type LVM2_member
  2. I followed this link to understand how to mount an LVM partition
  3. Upon following the above link, I was still encountering issues stating that I had `Bad magic number in super-block while trying to open Couldn't find valid filesystem superblock
  4. I then stumbled across this article which lead me to sudo mke2fs -n <device>
  5. Then, using one of the options that were output, I ran sudo e2fsck -b <one of the displayed options> <device>
  6. The e2fsck terminal went crazy at this point and spat out loads of numbers to the terminal for a few minutes. After it was finished, I restarted my machine and was able to gain access to my OS again.

So the issue is resolved but I'm still at a loss in regards to what actually happened.

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