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xrandr

--brightness brightness - multiply the gamma values on the crtc currently attached to the output to specified floating value. Useful for overly bright or overly dim outputs. However, this is a software only modification, if your hardware has support to actually change the brightness, you will probably prefer to use xbacklight.

What does it mean?!

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    It means that it doesn't actually change the brightness of your monitor, it just applies a filter to the colors so they look brighter. It's the same thing TV commercial use to sound louder without changing your hardware volume control, only with light instead of sound. You shouldn't really mess with the gamma settings unless you're forced to use an old, burnt-out CRT ;-) – mosvy Mar 28 at 19:17
  • mosvy, thank you. I assumed that was the case. I will need to learn more about how it actually does it – e.doroskevic Mar 28 at 19:47
  • Easy peasy, just look at the source code. – mirh Jun 23 at 13:13
  • @mirh Desk checking source code, especially legacy patched repatched code like Xorg, is not for the average user. BTW I only noticed your comment because my answer was downvoted about the same time :( – WinEunuuchs2Unix Jun 23 at 15:30
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It means laptops with built in displays have software to control the hardware brightness. There are no little knobs you can turn on laptops.

External monitors have knobs you can turn or buttons you can press to set hardware brightness.

On a laptop you use software to control the brightness like this:

# echo 2000 > /sys/class/backlight/intel_backlight/brightness
  • You probably know from AU that I like this type of answer (i.e. code that can be checked accompanied by an explanation). – karel Jun 24 at 2:49
  • @karel I see my whining in chat room has paid off with upvote to slow the bleeding. Thanks :) – WinEunuuchs2Unix Jun 24 at 2:53

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