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Whilst installing linux mint 19.1 cinnamon i checked the "I want third party drivers box". However, upon checking that box i was prompted to create a password in order to disable secure boot.

Thus, i disabled secure boot after rebooting my machine, as prompted.

Now however, after rebooting (and with every boot up) my monitor displays a huge warning reading "booting into insecure mode", before displaying the mint login screen.

Is this now something that i should not be bothered with, or did i mess up the installation process somewhere along the line? And is using this "insecure" mode somehow making me more susceptible to any "attacks" or the like - which the name seems to imply to a layman like me?

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    You title does not match the question body (yes it is related, but is not a summary of the question). Fixing it will get you better response. – ctrl-alt-delor May 26 at 9:00
  • You can disable/enable the secure boot from the UEFI/BIOS panel of your computer. About the attacks secure boot makes you enter password before you are allowed to access the UEFI panel , it ensures that someone won't plug USB and install new OS or something like this – Angel May 28 at 10:29
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As Linux does not support Secure Boot as of yet (without some kernel modification), there is no significant consequence of doing this.

is using this "insecure" mode somehow making me more susceptible to any "attacks" or the like

Maybe if you're using Windows, but if you care about security, then you wouldn't be using Windows in the first place. Linux is insusceptible to these attacks.

did i mess up the installation process somewhere along the line

No, you did not.

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Since secure boot only allows the computer to use trusted operating systems and drivers, protecting against rootkits, disabling it would allow malware to hide in the boot loader and make itself difficult to detect. While secure boot does not protect against malware, it attempts to prevent malware from getting a deeper foothold on the system. That being said, many Linux distributions require secure boot to be disabled in order to boot. From your post it sounds like Linux Mint might work with secure boot if you disable third party drivers, but the open source drivers could cause problems with your system's performance.

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