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https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/97764/674 says that nfs service isn't userspace process

Another option is that the socket doesn't belong to a process, it belongs to the kernel. One common example of this is NFS.

Does NFS follow the server-client model?

If yes, where and how are its server and its client running? How can I verify that? Are both NFS server and client run as modules to kernel?

The purpose of my question is to understand some sketch of the architecture of NFS.

Thanks.

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  • The NFS server runs on the system offering a filesystem for use.
  • The NFS client runs on one or more systems using an offered filesystem.

You can verify which is which by using rpcinfo as described in your linked question/answer.

  • Thanks. Can you verify them without using rpcinfo but something else? – Tim Mar 20 at 19:03
  • You could probably use showmount -e – roaima Mar 20 at 19:03
  • rcpinfo should be recommended way! – Vivek Kanadiya Mar 20 at 19:13
  • The purpose of my question is to understand the roughest sketch of the architecture of NFS. Are both NFS server and client run as modules to kernel? – Tim Mar 20 at 19:23
  • @Tim they may be. On my debian machine, I have installed nfs-kernel-server, which runs the server in the kernel (this is also the default on most distros). The answer you're linking to clearly assumes the same situation. But there's nothing "architecture" about it -- both the server and the client can be and have been implemented in userland. But even with the server in the kernel, some non performance-bound parts are still userland (mountd, statd). – mosvy Mar 20 at 20:33

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