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I was reviewing some old scripts on my machines and I saw this if expression and I have no idea what it is doing. Can someone explain it?

if ! [[ "${count// /}" =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]]
then
  echo 1
else
  echo $count
fi

value of count is sometimes string and sometimes an integer.

  • i think that count is always a string – jsotola Mar 17 at 7:21
  • @jsotola why??? – BlackCrystal Mar 17 at 7:24
  • You might be better off sticking to POSIX in that case (albeit at the expense of using a pipe). It seems more readable: echo "${count// /}" | grep -Eq "^[0-9]+$" && echo 0 || echo 1 even though not everybody (stackoverflow.com/questions/17420994/bash-regex-match-string) agrees. – Cbhihe Mar 17 at 12:02
  • 1
    @BlackCrystal A variable's value is always a string. If it is a number, such as 123, then it is a string of digits. Note too that -123 is an integer, but not a string of digits as it also contains a dash, and that 12.3e-23 and 0.123 are numbers, but not strings of digits exclusively. – Kusalananda Mar 17 at 12:28
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Let's break it down to individual components

  1. The syntax "${count// /}" is a parameter expansion syntax to replace all spaces in the content of variable with an empty string. e.g. 2 1 becomes just 21
  2. The part =~ ^[0-9]+$ runs the bash regex operation match the string on the left hand side to a set of digits only.
  3. The part ! [[..]] negates the whole operation, which means the condition becomes true only if the content of count is not a string of digits.
  4. On the positive condition of the if you echo out the numeric value of 1 and on failure of if, it returns the actual value of count without the stripping of spaces done in 1).
  • 2
    If it contains digits (and maybe some spaces) it's printed out with multiple adjacent spaces reduced to a single space, and leading/trailing space removed. – roaima Mar 17 at 7:19
  • 1
    why couldn't it be just if ! [[ $count =~ ^[0-9\ ]+$ ]] ...? – mosvy Mar 17 at 7:23
  • 1
    @BlackCrystal It is. Instead of removing the spaces and comparing against digits, the unmodified string is compared against digits and spaces. – Kusalananda Mar 17 at 8:14

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