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I have build my linux image with elbe linux build. This produces an image which can be copied to a filestorage and can be run. This works well if I use the output image and copy it with "dd"-command to the usb stick. The computer boots from the usb with no problems. If I try to install the new image from the live cd (USB-Stick) with the same "dd"-command using before , it does not work. It wont boot without the usb-stick plugged in. If I remove the usb-stick, I get the error " no bootable device found". If I plug in the USB-Stick, it boots with no problems.

I have looked at the mount output. I see that "/dev/mmcblk0" is used for my rfs. and "dev/sda5" is used for my /home folder. Somehow i think the bootloader is not found, if I unplug the usb-stick.

For understanding: /dev/sda is my USB-Stick /dev/mmcblk0 is my emmc card There are also two more partitions /dev/mmcblk0boot0 and /dev/mmcblk0boot1 dont know what there are for.

I tried also "grub-update" to /dev/mmcblk. The grub package is "grup-pc" Kernel is "linux-image-amd64". The Hardware has an intel atom cpu, the linux dist is debian stretch. It runs in legacy mode and secure boot is disabled.

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If I remove the usb-stick, I get the error " no bootable device found".

Somehow i think the bootloader is not found, if I unplug the usb-stick.

Unfortunately it looks like your thinking is exactly correct.

The first question is: Does the legacy mode BIOS even support booting from the eMMC? If not, then you cannot boot any operating system directly from that eMMC in legacy mode, but need to place the bootloader somewhere else. The symptoms indicate the answer might be "no".

There are also two more partitions /dev/mmcblk0boot0 and /dev/mmcblk0boot1 dont know what there are for.

The names suggests they might be related to booting from the eMMC. And the fact that they exist suggests that booting from an eMMC might be arranged very differently from booting from a regular disk or a disk-emulating device such as an USB stick.

It might be that your hardware is capable of booting directly from eMMC in UEFI mode only, or it might require setting up the eMMC for booting in some eMMC-specific way, which will be different from setting up a regular disk for BIOS-style boot. It might need some extra steps, or even a completely different set of steps.

The idea that all storage devices work the same is an illusion, brought on by operating system drivers, firmware compatibility layers and sometimes even hardware emulation. But the illusion is not perfect, and sometimes it shatters completely - like in case of your eMMC.

  • Thank you for your answer i will see if i can somehow get it to work. I had installed a normal linux debian netinstall and it worked fine. – dieter hansen Mar 8 at 14:01

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