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In the output of sudo parted -l:

Model: WD My Passport 0748 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdb: 1000GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos
Disk Flags: 

Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system  Flags
 1      1049kB  1000GB  1000GB  primary  ntfs


Model: WDC WD25 00BEVS-08VAT2 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdc: 250GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: gpt
Disk Flags: 

Number  Start   End    Size   File system  Name  Flags
 1      1049kB  250GB  250GB  ntfs               msftdata


Model: Linux device-mapper (linear) (dm)
Disk /dev/mapper/VG-home: 452GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: loop
Disk Flags: 

Number  Start  End    Size   File system  Flags
 1      0.00B  452GB  452GB  ext4

Does partition table type "msdos" mean MBR? Isn't it that MBR can't hold a 4GB file, but I can copy a 4GB Windows 8.1 .iso file to it?

Is partition table type "gpt" good for an external hard drive?

What does "Partition Table: loop" mean? Is it relate to loop device?

What does "msftdata" in Flags mean?

Thanks.

2

“msdos” does mean MBR, yes. That has no relation to the file systems used, which is where a file size limit would come from.

GPT is fine for an external drive.

The “loop” partition type is used by parted for raw disk access, i.e. when there’s no partition table.

“msftdata” is a parted flag used to indicate that the partition uses the basic data GUID, not one of the Linux-specific GUIDs.

  • Thanks. (1) "The “loop” partition type is used by parted for raw disk access, i.e. when there’s no partition table". In LVM, does a VG necessarily not have a partition table? Does a LV necessarily not have a partition table? (2) “msdos does mean MBR," Isn't it that MBR can't hold a 4GB file, but why can I copy a 4GB Windows 8.1 .iso file to it? – Tim Feb 26 at 20:06
  • The MBR can only hold 512 bytes. No more. No less. But you can "copy" a 4GB Windows 8.1 .iso file to it, it won't be a great loss ;-\ – pizdelect Feb 26 at 20:11
  • Is max file size limit imposed by filesystem (fat32) or partition type (MBR) or both? – Tim Feb 26 at 20:12
  • (1) As has been mentioned previously by others, you can add a partition table pretty much anywhere you want, but it won’t be all that useful. From LVM’s perspective, a VG doesn’t have a partition table, nor does an LV. (2) I said that a file size limit comes from the file system used: MBR doesn’t impose any file size limit in the file systems contained in partitions in an MBR table. When you copy a file, you’re not copying it to an MBR partition table. – Stephen Kitt Feb 26 at 20:28
  • Thanks. /dev/mapper/VG-home is a LV, and VG is a VG. Why does parted output treat a LV as if it were a disk, and not show VG like disk at all? Isn't a LV more similar to a partition than a disk, and a VG similar to a disk? So does speaking a LV having a partition table make as little sense as speaking a partition having a partition table ? – Tim Feb 27 at 1:57

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