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I am running OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. I don't recall what choice I made during the installation process months ago, but I am running out of disk space and need to find a solution.

Can I just move my mount point for my /home partition? Would I need to format this partition first? What other steps?

If it is more complicated, what would I need to do? I am looking into getting a larger drive, but I suspect I have a lot of space to work with here.

Any more specific recommendations for making best use of this drive?
I have a pretty small /home partition and what looks like a lot of complication elsewhere...

~> df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs        1.9G     0  1.9G   0% /dev
tmpfs           1.9G   93M  1.8G   5% /dev/shm
tmpfs           1.9G  9.9G  1.9G   1% /run
tmpfs           1.9G     0  1.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /tmp
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /srv
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /opt
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /usr/local
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /.snapshots
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /boot/grub2/x86_64-efi
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /root
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /boot/grub2/i386-pc
/dev/sda6        23G   15G  7.5G  66% /var
/dev/sda7        12G   12G  420K 100% /home
tmpfs           382M  8.8M  373M   3% /run/user/1000

And some apparently unmounted and unused partitions that are taking up most of the space...

~> sudo fdisk -l
[sudo] password for root:
Disk /dev/sda: 119.2 GiB, 128035676160 bytes, 250069680 sectors                   
Disk model: SAMSUNG SSD SM84
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes                             
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes                                 
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x2c8ae105

Device     Boot     Start       End  Sectors  Size Id Type                        
/dev/sda1            2048   4208639  4206592    2G 82 Linux swap / Solaris        
/dev/sda2  *      4208640  88100863 83892224   40G 83 Linux                       
/dev/sda3        88100864 171986943 83886080   40G 83 Linux                       
/dev/sda4       171986944 250069679 78082736 37.2G  f W95 Ext'd (LBA)             
/dev/sda5       242255872 250069679  7813808  3.7G 82 Linux swap / Solaris        
/dev/sda6       171988992 218343423 46354432 22.1G 83 Linux                       
/dev/sda7       218345472 242255743 23910272 11.4G 83 Linux                       

Partition table entries are not in disk order.  

This is the results of the Disks application: Results of <code>Disks</code> application

~ sudo /sbin/swapon --show
[sudo] password for root:
NAME      TYPE      SIZE USED PRIO
/dev/sda5 partition 3.7G 1.4G   -2



~> sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/sda && ls -Al /mnt/sda
total 0
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 1854 Dec 16 16:09 bin
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 1700 Dec 16 16:22 boot
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 16 15:32 dev
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 6026 Dec 17 19:06 etc
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Sep 30  2017 home
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 4158 Dec 16 16:12 lib
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  144 Dec 16 16:12 lib64
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    6 Dec 17 17:19 mnt
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Sep 30  2017 opt
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Sep 30  2017 proc
drwx------ 1 root root  174 May 25  2018 root
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 16 16:21 run
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 4600 Dec 16 16:09 sbin
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 May 25  2018 selinux
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Feb 22 12:11 .snapshots
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Sep 30  2017 srv
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Sep 30  2017 sys
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Sep 30  2017 tmp
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  150 Dec 12 08:36 usr
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  136 Dec 16 16:22 var

That looks like another linux distro on /dev/sda2

~ sudo umount /mnt/sda
~ sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/sda && ls -Al /mnt/sda
total 0
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 1828 Dec 17 21:10 bin
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  412 Dec 17 21:24 boot
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 dev
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 5060 Dec 17 22:34 etc
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 home
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 3350 Dec 17 21:21 lib
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 May 25  2018 mnt
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 opt
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 proc
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 root
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 21:23 run
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 3686 Dec 17 21:13 sbin
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 May 25  2018 selinux
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 .snapshots
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 srv
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 sys
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 tmp
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   90 Dec 17 20:52 usr
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root    0 Dec 17 20:51 var

and another on /dev/sda3

  • please add output of /sbin/swapon --show. – ctrl-alt-delor Feb 21 at 23:12
  • Can you investigate what is on the other partitions, and confirm which ones can be destroyer, and which need keeping. You can mount them e.g. sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt, they will appear on /mnt, you can dismount with umount /mnt. – ctrl-alt-delor Feb 21 at 23:14
  • swapon shows sda5 partition – simchuck Feb 22 at 20:15
  • Both sda2 and sda3 seem to have another linux distribution. I did a full reinstall on the system a month or so ago, and I know I was dealing with some problem with snapper prior to that. Maybe that's where they came from? – simchuck Feb 22 at 20:17
  • Checking these two partitions again using cat etc/*release, both sda2 and sda3 have OpenSUSE Tumbleweed version 20181213. My base system has OpenSUSE Tubmleweed version 20190115. – simchuck Feb 22 at 20:53
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If you don't need partitions sda1 to sda3, then you can

using gparted:

  • Remove partitions sda1 to sda3
  • resize sda4, to the start of the disk.
  • optionally:
    • move sda5 and sda6 (root and swap) to start of disk (higher risk and takes more time).
    • add a new partition at the start of the disk, for /home, and move content of home to this new partition.
  • I deleted sda1, sda2 and sda3, but wasnt able to resize sda4 - is that because it is a MBR extended partition? I did create a new partition in that space, and copied my home laririon usinc rsync. That seems to be fine, but seems like the partitions are a bit messy. Is there any way to tidy this up without having to move everything to a new disk? I guess getting away from MBR would require a full backup and reinstall? – simchuck Feb 26 at 23:35
  • Show us your new layout: add an edit to the question. – ctrl-alt-delor Feb 27 at 11:23
  • I just noticed the one of the removed partitions is the boot partition. There will be an extra step at the end, to make system bootable again. (but this is not your current problem). – ctrl-alt-delor Feb 27 at 11:24
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    Just one note on the multiple partitions with distros on it. If you don't use the expert partitioner during the installation and remove unused partitions the installer won't touch them and proceed with the installation to the available space. – eblock Feb 28 at 14:39
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  • problem 1, your disk has MBR (master boot record) type of partitioning, opposed to the better GPT. MBR is limited to 4 primary partitions, which is why you see the Extended Partition with multiple partitions within
  • problem 2, did you have an operating system like Windows and another operating system on this disk prior to installing suse linux afterwards? That would explain the MBR partitioning, which suse did the best it on it's own preserving what was on the disk and why you seem to be out of space. Also there is Partition 1 swap 2.2 gb then [extended] partition 4 with your suse also has a subpartition of 4 gb swap. You should only have one swap partition.

so yes there's some extra complications going on, which is a result from not recalling what choice I made during the installation process and letting it choose things automatically.

if you have data you wish to keep, find some place to copy or back it up to. My recommendation would be to wipe this disk by reinstalling suse (or other linux) from scratch and taking manual control of the installation process; do not choose automatic especially for disk partitioning. During the installation do

  • Go into disk partitioning, uncheck automatic, change partition from MBR to GPT; it will warn of deleting all contents on disk.
  • don't use BTRFS, it tends to complicate the layout as you are experiencing. Only use BTRFS if you know what you are doing and are in to it.
  • take manual control during the installation process for disk, don't choose automatic, and keep it simply like the following

    • format disk as GPT (this will lose all data on disk)
    • make one boot partition of 1GB
    • make one swap partition of 2GB
    • make one root partition as EXT3, EXT4, or XFS on the rest of the disk
    • do not make a separate home partition

that will basically give /dev/sda1 as 1 gb, /dev/sda2 as 2 gb swap, /dev/sda3 at ~119GB as /. everything then lives under / including /home. If you then run out of space, it's because of disk size not the partitioning. If you don't know why your /home folder is on a separate partition, then you do not need it to be that way.

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