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I heard that a partition used to house logical partitions is called an extended partition.

Can an extended partition originally be either a primary partition or a logical partition? Or must an extended partition originally be a primary partition, but not a logical partition?

In other words, if you have an extended partition wherein you have several logical partitions, can you make one logical partition become an extended partition to create logical partitions recursively?

Thanks.

closed as off-topic by Stéphane Chazelas, Jeff Schaller, Michael Homer, Scott, Christopher Feb 21 at 12:44

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    You seem to be referring to the MS-DOS partitioning scheme as was used on PCs before GPT. Though most Unix-like systems understand that partitioning scheme, it's off-topic here as you're not asking about anything specific to Unix or Linux. – Stéphane Chazelas Feb 20 at 16:13
  • @StéphaneChazelas, IMO this is not off-topic because partitioning is done on every linux installation. – Romeo Ninov Feb 20 at 16:15
  • @StéphaneChazelas the so called "MS-DOS" partitioning scheme should be called "Linux" partitioning scheme, since Linux has the most complete and best documented implementation of it, and other x86 Unices were not able to use logical partitions until fairly recently (a well-known bsd variant had a ridiculously broken implementation of it until 8 years or so ago). – mosvy Feb 20 at 19:18
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You need to understand the partitions logic:

  1. You may have maximum of 4 primary or extended partitions on disk (MBR disks)
  2. You can have only one extended partition
  3. If you want more you must have extended partition and inside this partition create logical partitions.
  4. Think about extended partition as container of logical partitions.
  5. You can't have filesystem on extended partition.

Maybe this Wikipedia page can give you more information about the subject

EDIT1: You can't convert logical to extended (and continue recursively) because you have already one extended (where this logical is created)

  • Can an extended partition originally be either a primary partition or a logical partition? Or must an extended partition originally be a primary partition, but not a logical partition? – Tim Feb 20 at 16:03
  • It can be primary, but "converted" to extended. Usually this is done by destroy the primary and create extended. And you can have only one extended on disk – Romeo Ninov Feb 20 at 16:07
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    Must a logical partition reside in an extended partition? In other words, if there exists a logical partition, does that mean there is already an extended partition? – Tim Feb 20 at 16:07
  • @tim, correct. Logical must be in extended – Romeo Ninov Feb 20 at 16:08
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    I recommend not to use MBR partitioning, and use GPT instead. It's so much simpler: there is just one type of partition, and there is no practical limit on how many partitions a disk can hold. I even recommend using GPT on a non-EFI machine, you just need a small BIOS boot partition for Grub. – Johan Myréen Feb 20 at 16:14

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