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I installed Windows 10 on my SSD and then CentOS 7. After the CentOS install's final reboot, there isn't an entry in grub for my Windows 10 stuff.

Here's fdisk -l

isk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: gpt
Disk identifier: 873E25DD-2CDA-11E9-AD60-38BAF8FA5F68


#         Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 1         2048      1026047    500M  Microsoft basic 
 2      1026048    316117075  150.3G  Microsoft basic 
 3    316119040    316323839    100M  EFI System      
 4    316323840    317951999    795M  Windows recover 
 5    317968384    635920383  151.6G  Microsoft basic 
 6    635936768    953888767  151.6G  Microsoft basic 
 7    953905152   1052209151   46.9G  Microsoft basic 
 8   1052225536   1117761535   31.3G  Linux filesyste 
 9   1117777920   1150545919   15.6G  Linux filesyste 
10   1150562304   1183330303   15.6G  Linux filesyste 
11   1183346688   1216114687   15.6G  Linux filesyste 
12   1216131072   1248899071   15.6G  Linux filesyste 
13   1248915456   1281683455   15.6G  Linux filesyste 
14   1281699840   1380003839   46.9G  Linux swap      
15    317952000    317956095      2M  BIOS boot       
16   1697988608   1953509375  121.9G  Linux filesyste 
17   1380003840   1697988607  151.6G  Linux LVM       

Disk /dev/mapper/centos-root: 162.8 GB, 162806104064 bytes, 317980672 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

So I edited /etc/grub.d/40_custom like so:

#!/bin/sh
exec tail -n +3 $0
# This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries.  Simply type the
# menu entries you want to add after this comment.  Be careful not to change
# the 'exec tail' line above.
menuentry "Windows 10" {
        set root(hd0,3)
        chainloader +1
        }

And then ran:

grub2-mkconfig --output=/boot/grub2/grub.cfg

When I rebooted, and selected the menu entry for "Windows 10", I got this:

Error: not an assignment invalid signature

I'm stuck, how can I get the Windows stuff in my grub so I can boot from either OS?

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Someone in another forum told me not to use CSM.

Well... out of complete frustration, I wiped the disk, set CSM to disabled (ASUS lied), installed Windows, installed CentOS again.

Interestingly enough, the partition wizard had an option for /boot/efi as a mount point this time! That was NOT there with CSM enabled.

So I selected /boot/efi and when the install finished, I had both Windows and Linux in my boot menu!

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