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I have tried casper-rw and ext2.

The following questions are where I'm at:

  1. Can I use a Linux boot stick to check the desktop windows partition for viruses and/or rootkits? If not, why?

  2. How is a casper-rw file different from a casper-rw partition (or is it the same thing?)

  3. What are limitations of a persistence Linux boot stick that I might (and most probably are) not be aware of?

closed as too broad by GAD3R, RalfFriedl, Mr Shunz, Thomas, Archemar Jan 30 at 13:24

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    kali? Don't think the kali distro is a good place to start for the linux novice... Linux boot will allow you to do most anything needed on your Windows partitions. – jc__ Jan 28 at 18:28
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    @jc__ I agree with Kali Linux not being the best option to get to know the Linux universe. Then again I usually drive on curiosity as a motivator - so sometimes I don't go the obvious/convenient way. I'll keep it in mind though. – jaborvols Jan 29 at 12:19
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    @K7AAY 1. Mostly virus /rootkit scans or data rescue 2. understood 3. That's what I meant - thanks for clarifying. Will check out the links you provided >> – jaborvols Jan 29 at 13:36
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    @K7AAY enhanced the first question accordingly - thanks for pointing it out – jaborvols Jan 29 at 16:58
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    @GAD3R thanks! I guess it's not hard to see I'm new to this. Is it "acceptable" if I just edit it down to one question in this case? Obviously I don't want to cross any rules. – jaborvols Jan 29 at 17:23
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1: Can I use a Linux boot stick to check the desktop windows partition for viruses and/or rootkits? Yes, you can. Examples include Bitdefender, AntiVirus Live, and numerous others.

2: How is a casper-rw file different from a casper-rw partition? Same thing, a casper-rw file is treated as if it is a writable partition, and is used to store your changes and additions to the filesystem.

3: What are limitations of a Linux boot stick with persistence that I might (and most probably are) not be aware of? They boot slower, and most LiveUSB creation tools (one example), if they offer persistence, are limited to a maximum of 4095 KB in persistent size. See https://www.pendrivelinux.com/what-is-persistent-linux for an overview and, for an explanation of how to exceed that normal limit, see https://www.pendrivelinux.com/create-a-larger-than-4gb-casper-partition .

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