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I have a Seagate disk that I am trying to get partition aligned. I've tried this command in parted:

sudo parted /dev/sda mklabel gpt

sudo parted -a opt /dev/sda mkpart primary ext4 0% 100%

Get this fdisk error:

Device     Start         End     Sectors  Size Type
/dev/sda1  65535 15628000379 15627934845  7.3T Linux filesystem

Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary.

How do I get this disk partion aligment in parted ?

(I've also tried this guide: https://rainbow.chard.org/2013/01/30/how-to-align-partitions-for-best-performance-using-parted/

unsuccessfully)

A little info about harddrive:

root@odroidxu4:~# cat /sys/block/sda/queue/optimal_io_size 33553920
root@odroidxu4:~# cat /sys/block/sda/queue/minimum_io_size 4096
root@odroidxu4:~# cat /sys/block/sda/alignment_offset 0
root@odroidxu4:~# cat /sys/block/sda/queue/physical_block_size 4096
root@odroidxu4:~# hdparm -I /dev/sda

ATA device, with non-removable media
    Model Number:       ST8000VN0022-2EL112
    Serial Number:      ZA1CH2SF
    Firmware Revision:  SC61
    Transport:          Serial, ATA8-AST, SATA 1.0a, SATA II Extensions, SAT                                                                                        A Rev 2.5, SATA Rev 2.6, SATA Rev 3.0

Configuration:
    Logical         max     current
    cylinders       16383   16383
    heads           16      16
    sectors/track   63      63
    --
    CHS current addressable sectors:    16514064
    LBA    user addressable sectors:   268435455
    LBA48  user addressable sectors: 15628053168
    Logical  Sector size:                   512 bytes
    Physical Sector size:                  4096 bytes
    Logical Sector-0 offset:                  0 bytes
    device size with M = 1024*1024:     7630885 MBytes
    device size with M = 1000*1000:     8001563 MBytes (8001 GB)
    cache/buffer size  = unknown
    Form Factor: 3.5 inch
    Nominal Media Rotation Rate: 7200
  • Please format your code/data blocks. Select each block in turn and use the {} button on the editing menu to indent it four spaces. Also ensure there's a blank line above and below each block. (I'd do it for you if i weren't on a mobile device that doesn't have {}.) – roaima Jan 4 at 23:16
  • get rid of -a opt and use mib instead of % – frostschutz Jan 4 at 23:39
  • I am not a linux nerd can you write full command frostschutz ? – Rene Mortensen Jan 4 at 23:40
  • As I understand "-a opt" to tell parted to must align (optimal) but why it doesn't work I don't understand? When I check if it is aligned in parted it is ok but not in fdisk :/ – Rene Mortensen Jan 4 at 23:43
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    parted /dev/sda mkpart PARTITION_NAME ext4 1MiB 100% – AlexP Jan 5 at 0:47
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Don't use parted, as it is obviously not up to the job. To partition a GPT disk, use gdisk. Alternatively, if your version of fdisk understands GPT partitions, you can use that as well. Just delete the partition and create a new partition. Format the partition with mkfs.ext4. Note that doing so will destroy any data you already have written to the disk.

  • parted is perfectly able to do the job. Just tell it where to put the partition. It accepts exact positioning at the level of sectors. – AlexP Jan 5 at 0:44
  • @AlexP Well, why don't you show how to use parted to create a partition that is aligned so that the starting sector is a multiple of eight (required by the physical sector size of the disk)? Gdisk does this automatically. – Johan Myréen Jan 5 at 0:49
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    parted <disk> mkpart <partition_name> <filesystem_type> <start> <end>, where <start> and <end> can be given in sectors (e.g., 2048s), binary megabytes (e.g., 1MiB) etc. – AlexP Jan 5 at 1:07
  • Now I have tried Gdisk and it seems to work out of the box but what should I choose in : Hex code or GUID (L to show codes, Enter = 8300): Is just a linux etx4 share on debian – Rene Mortensen Jan 5 at 11:44
  • The default value 8300 stands for "Linux filesystem", which is OK in this case. – Johan Myréen Jan 5 at 13:33

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