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I am trying to set up Linux (Debian 9) machines in a computer lab to let users plug in their arduino interface and flash their device with their code.

I do not really know about arduino and so on, and my arduino users do not know about linux. I also have never really done things with udev.

I am inspecting the script in the arduino IDE distro. It creates udev rules which I think are aimed at populating /dev with devices when a range of arduino-compatible interfaces are plugged in.

The devices belong to specific user groups and the scripts adds the current user to said groups to make things work. Now, I need all people who use these machines to be able to use arduino, but I do not want to add them all to the groups (this would require changing the ldap config which is out of my realm).

I am tempted to tweak the udev rules in the scripts to set the devices to mode 666 instead of 660.

Is this a reasonable way to achieve what I want ?

(also, if you think letting all users have access is a terrible idea, please say so and explain ; I assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong)

  • Not super helpful to your question, but wanted to highlight "assume that the arduino card is just a serial-like peripheral so it cannot per se do more harm to the system than a keyboard but I may be wrong"...... Arduino's have writable memory (as do some modern keyboards and mice). This "could" introduce risk, but I wouldn't think your situation necessitates going overboard. Just wanted to point this out :) – bgregs Nov 28 '18 at 21:54
  • Thanks for the remark. Inhowfar would this introduce a risk (anymore than allowing the use of USB storage devices) ? – ysalmon Nov 28 '18 at 22:06
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    I wouldn't think the risk would be any greater than allowing standard USB flash drives. My previous employer used to limit ANY USB storage device on company laptops and it made for a very painful work environment. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but it is up to you to decide what is best for your situation :) – bgregs Nov 30 '18 at 21:28

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