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As I have the 7th gen Intel CPU (i7-7700HQ) and in UEFI BIOS there is a possibility to Enable Intel® SGX™ (Software Guard Extensions™), I would like to do so.

In order to do that, I am unsure, if I really need to, but let's suppose I do have to have the following libraries compiled, mentioned in an Intel article:

  • libsgx_uae_service.so

  • libsgx_urts.so

On GitHub, I may have found the project that would do just that:

https://github.com/intel/linux-sgx


I've installed all of the mentioned prerequisites already.

The compilation directly with make went well.

But, since I do not understand this topic as well as I would like, I hesitate if and how to install it.


So, to the question: I seek guidance on enabling / installing Intel® SGX™ on my Linux system, which is based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Any and all information welcome. You can also include if the SGX would bring any benefits to me.

I am sure this is impossible to evaluate without knowing what applications I use.

These I use on daily basis:

  • Chrome for all browsing, including Flash games

  • Thunderbird for my company emails

  • Code for scripting

  • Steam games for fun

  • VirtualBox for BSD systems, not really often using those

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Enabling SGX doesn’t involve any operating-system-level drivers. If you enable it in your firmware setup, it becomes available for applications, which can then use SGX to create “enclaves” to protect sensitive data.

You should only need the SGX SDK if you want to build applications which need it. (It might however be the only way currently to obtain the required runtime libraries.)

  • Wait, about what you've added here: What are those required runtime libraries for? – LinuxSecurityFreak Nov 24 '18 at 13:20
  • Applications built with the SDK still need the corresponding runtime libraries to use SGX; these libraries implement the application side of SGX. If you ever need them, the application’s installation instructions will mention them (or if it’s packaged, it should pull in the appropriate package dependency, perhaps as an optional dependency). – Stephen Kitt Nov 24 '18 at 13:36

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