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I installed the latest GNU/Bash and gnu coreutils on Mac

$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.4.23(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin18.0.0)

check the coreutils with a g prefix

$ gls -l $(which gls)
lrwxr-xr-x 1 me admin 32 Oct 27 12:50 /usr/local/bin/gls -> ../Cellar/coreutils/8.30/bin/gls

When it come to man

$ man gman
No manual entry for gman

It fall back to error,

$ man man
#works but get BSD manual in year 2003 as return.

I am noticed that coreutils are composed of GNU fileutils, shellutils and textutils, so the manual should have a solution to be checked.

How could I refer to gnu manual from the bash.

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  • Is man part of coreutils, ie. is there any gman program at all on your system? Try man gls, man gln, etc. and if they don't work, try with man -M /usr/local/man .... – mosvy Oct 27 '18 at 16:49
  • I'm pretty sure man is not part of coreutils but I could be wrong. MacOS uses a man configuration file in /private/etc/man.conf. Locate the bash man page you're trying to view and note the directory path. You can use mosvy's -M command to verify and then add the path to the config file. Or you can set and use your own $MANPATH variable. – kevlinux Oct 27 '18 at 18:13
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When you installed GNU coreutils with Homebrew on your macOS machine, you got this message at the end of the successful installation:

All commands have been installed with the prefix 'g'.

If you really need to use these commands with their normal names, you
can add a "gnubin" directory to your PATH from your bashrc like:

    PATH="/usr/local/opt/coreutils/libexec/gnubin:$PATH"

Additionally, you can access their man pages with normal names if you add
the "gnuman" directory to your MANPATH from your bashrc as well:

    MANPATH="/usr/local/opt/coreutils/libexec/gnuman:$MANPATH"

==> Summary
🍺  /usr/local/Cellar/coreutils/8.30: 430 files, 8.8MB

Did you try updating your MANPATH variable?

After executing the suggested command, you would get the manual of GNU ls by typing man gls.

The modification to MANPATH is something you can put in your ~/.bash_profile file (or wherever you update PATH in a similar manner).


The installation message above can also be read with brew info coreutils after installation.

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  • I appreciate deeply your help, my master. – AbstProcDo Oct 28 '18 at 1:19

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