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When using chrony, I synchronize the time from the clock source of stratum=2. Is there any way to prevent my machine from stratum=3, but stratum is equal to 2?

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this is my machine

MS Name/IP address          Stratum  Poll Reach LastRx Last sample
=====================================================================================
^* 10.211.55.22                   3     6   377    51   -1374us[-2993us]  +/-   179ms

this is the External clock source

MS Name/IP address          Stratum  Poll Reach LastRx Last sample
=====================================================================================
^* cn.ntp.faelix.net               2   7    377   129    +231us[+2929us]  +/-   216ms

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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  • Are you asking (a) to prevent your machine from using sources whose stratum is higher than 2? or (b) that you think your machine should also be stratum=2 because that's what you're syncing to? – Jeff Schaller Sep 27 '18 at 15:23
  • I want my machine stratum=2 ,like the stratum of the external clock source. – nbamboo Sep 27 '18 at 15:54
  • Connect a suitable GPS receiver to your machine, and then it can be stratum=1 instead. – telcoM Sep 27 '18 at 17:03
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NTP stratum levels are incremented at each "hop" -- since you're synchronized to a stratum 2 device, your stratum is calculated to be 3.

From the NTP How does it work? FAQ:

Basically (and from the perspective from a client) it [stratum] is the number of servers to a reference clock.

A server synchronized to a stratum n server will be running at stratum n + 1. The upper limit for stratum is 15. The purpose of stratum is to avoid synchronization loops by preferring servers with a lower stratum.

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  • So there is no way to avoid stratum n+1, this is the inherent mechanism of chronyd or ntpd – nbamboo Sep 27 '18 at 15:45
  • That's correct, @nbamboo. – Jeff Schaller Sep 27 '18 at 16:07

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