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I know that udisks2 can be used to mount filesystems. But what kind of filesystems? By reading information around this is not completely clear to me.

Can I only mount local filesystems? Or can I mount anything that I can mount using the mount command, like, for instance, smb shares using cifs? In case this was possible, can you provide an example of how to mount a smb share using udisks2 from command line? Thanks.

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I know that udisks2 can be used to mount filesystems. But what kind of filesystems?

  • Mostly, disks :-P. Or rather, filesystems on removable disks / removable media in general.
    • Provided they are not Windows recovery drives?
    • This includes filesystems on a partition of the drive, but not too complex stuff like LVM. Apparently some form of encryption can be supported though.
    • On a multi-seat system, the drive should belong to your seat.
  • But also, entries in fstab (and/or crypttab?). I think if there's an fstab entry for a removable device, udisks forces you to use that. For other types of filesystem in fstab, I think you will also be allowed if the entry includes the "user or "users" option. There's also a negative option, x-udisks-auth that requires authentication as admin - I guess you can use this to restrict a specific removable device.

If you're interested in how e.g. GNOME Files is able to mount cifs shares as a normal user, you may look at gvfs-mount.

  • @LucaCarlon added comment about how you can mount cifs shares like nautilus does. – sourcejedi Aug 24 '18 at 8:46

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